From: pa_nk on
A few months ago I had a back problem and visited my local
chiropractor. After doing X-rays, taking a history, diagnosis etc. and
then having him do 2-3 adjustments per week over a few months, my back
pain improved significantly and then went away completely.

Excellent I thought - I've never gone to a chiropractor before and he
fixed me.

Now I've been seeing him every 2 weeks for 'maintenance' adjustment.
This costs about $30 a shot. He always wants to sign me up for payment
plans. I'm getting the distinct impression I should be 'adjusted' every
2 weeks forever!

Let's see - $30 per adjustment x 26 per year x every year for life x
the number of patients in his practice = quite a hefty sum!

Has anyone else noticed this? Do I need maintenance on a continuing
basis forever?

From: Rich on

<pa_nk(a)hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1147401041.959354.259450(a)j33g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>A few months ago I had a back problem and visited my local
> chiropractor. After doing X-rays, taking a history, diagnosis etc. and
> then having him do 2-3 adjustments per week over a few months, my back
> pain improved significantly and then went away completely.
>
> Excellent I thought - I've never gone to a chiropractor before and he
> fixed me.
>
> Now I've been seeing him every 2 weeks for 'maintenance' adjustment.
> This costs about $30 a shot. He always wants to sign me up for payment
> plans. I'm getting the distinct impression I should be 'adjusted' every
> 2 weeks forever!
>
> Let's see - $30 per adjustment x 26 per year x every year for life x
> the number of patients in his practice = quite a hefty sum!
>
> Has anyone else noticed this? Do I need maintenance on a continuing
> basis forever?
>

How many chiropractors does it take to change a light bulb?

Only one, but it will require nine months of weekly "adjustments."

;o) Rich


From: Freddy on

<pa_nk(a)hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1147401041.959354.259450(a)j33g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> A few months ago I had a back problem and visited my local
> chiropractor. After doing X-rays, taking a history, diagnosis etc. and
> then having him do 2-3 adjustments per week over a few months, my back
> pain improved significantly and then went away completely.
>
> Excellent I thought - I've never gone to a chiropractor before and he
> fixed me.
>
> Now I've been seeing him every 2 weeks for 'maintenance' adjustment.
> This costs about $30 a shot. He always wants to sign me up for payment
> plans. I'm getting the distinct impression I should be 'adjusted' every
> 2 weeks forever!
>
> Let's see - $30 per adjustment x 26 per year x every year for life x
> the number of patients in his practice = quite a hefty sum!
>
> Has anyone else noticed this? Do I need maintenance on a continuing
> basis forever?

Why not ease up on the treatment and see if your problem re-occurs? You can
always make another appointment, right? My view is that a spine with normal
ranges of motion, normal strength, and no pain does require some regular
maintenance, but in the form of sensible exercise relevant to your
biomechanics.
Other practitioners see the value in manipulating isolated segmental motion
anomolies ie "subluxations". To me, doing that too frequently can lead to
hypermobilities.
The biggest problem with the clinical dynamics of successful treatment
technique is just that. The doctor feels good that the patient feels good on
account of what the doctor did to the patient, so hey! Lets "do it" over and
over and over. Its a good thing right? Like telling the same good story too
many times. The repetition of the treatment can lead to problems and also,
it puts the doctor in the "auto-treat" mode with his patient, and CAN lead
to complacency in detecting new problems which may crop up. "Oh yeah, its
Mrs. Jones again yep L-5 posterior on right,.pop1...What did you say? You
have a sore neck lately? We'll check that ol' pesky C-7 again, click click
pop..."
Problem is Mrs Jones has developed a disch hernaition at C-5. Chiro missed
it. Too busy with his hands instead of his ear, his head and his heart...


From: The Boom King on
pa_nk(a)hotmail.com wrote:
> A few months ago I had a back problem and visited my local
> chiropractor. After doing X-rays, taking a history, diagnosis etc. and
> then having him do 2-3 adjustments per week over a few months, my back
> pain improved significantly and then went away completely.
>
> Excellent I thought - I've never gone to a chiropractor before and he
> fixed me.
>
> Now I've been seeing him every 2 weeks for 'maintenance' adjustment.
> This costs about $30 a shot. He always wants to sign me up for payment
> plans. I'm getting the distinct impression I should be 'adjusted' every
> 2 weeks forever!
>
> Let's see - $30 per adjustment x 26 per year x every year for life x
> the number of patients in his practice = quite a hefty sum!
>
> Has anyone else noticed this? Do I need maintenance on a continuing
> basis forever?

Chiropractic may or may not be used ethically, just as any other
profession. Given that, here are a few things to consider:

The subject of whether or not chiropractic is effective in treating
uncomplicated back pain has long been settled... it is. However the
practice itself was not developed and is not limited to simply treat
back pain. Chiropractic adjustments improve the functioning of the
nervous system regardless of the presence of pain or other symptoms.
You can look at this type of treatment as preventative, or better yet
"wellness care". The detection and removal of spinal subluxations will
be a part of a lifestyle that is focused on achieving optimal health.
Physical, Spiritual and Mental well-being are necessary for optimal
health and can be pursued with exercise, good nutrition, adequate rest,
and stress reduction (either reducing stress-causing conditions or
developing practices that reduce the effects of stress). The important
thing to note in this model (which is certainly not unique to
chiropractic, but is in harmony with its central philosophy) is that the
focus is on increasing health, not on reducing symptoms. In contrast to
the medical model, a person with no symptoms is not necessarily as
healthy as the next person (I'm not as healthy as Lance Armstrong,
though we both may be symptom/disease free to an MD). Raising your
level of health to its optimum requires action on your part that can be
greatly facilitated by many holistic practitioners in many different
disciplines.

If your only concern is the current presence or absence of pain, then
ongoing chiropractic evaluation is not for you. If you want to increase
your health towards its potential, become involved with your
chiropractor and find what is right for you. You may do just as well
getting checked once a month as twice a month. You can develop a
conscious relationship with the functioning of your body and mind and
easily determine for yourself if you need a chiropractic adjustment.
Yoga and meditation are particularly helpful in this pursuit. Some
people don't want to go that far and find, after trial and error, that
their life is better with regular chiropractic evaluations (they sleep
better, digest better, have more energy, etc.). BTW, the best chiro
evaluation is one in which you don't need an adjustment, just like a
check-up at the dentist. Would you wait until you have an abscessed
tooth to make your first visit to the dentist?

People in this country spend a great deal of money on fitness clubs,
organic food, bottled water, Yoga classes, therapy, mattresses,
massages, etc. All in the pursuit of increasing their health and living
better, longer lives. Chiropractic has a valid place in this scheme,
that place is determined by you based on what you want out of life.

A good chiropractor will encourage you to make positive changes in your
life, perhaps refer you to other professionals in the community who can
help with this, leading to such a dramatic increase in your wellness
that you almost never "need" to see him at all. Not a very good scam.


--
Boom!
From: Freddy on

The Boom King <Boom!@spamsux.com> wrote in message
news:FOT8g.1104$uB5.789(a)fe03.lga...
> pa_nk(a)hotmail.com wrote:
> > A few months ago I had a back problem and visited my local
> > chiropractor. After doing X-rays, taking a history, diagnosis etc. and
> > then having him do 2-3 adjustments per week over a few months, my back
> > pain improved significantly and then went away completely.
> >
> > Excellent I thought - I've never gone to a chiropractor before and he
> > fixed me.
> >
> > Now I've been seeing him every 2 weeks for 'maintenance' adjustment.
> > This costs about $30 a shot. He always wants to sign me up for payment
> > plans. I'm getting the distinct impression I should be 'adjusted' every
> > 2 weeks forever!
> >
> > Let's see - $30 per adjustment x 26 per year x every year for life x
> > the number of patients in his practice = quite a hefty sum!
> >
> > Has anyone else noticed this? Do I need maintenance on a continuing
> > basis forever?
>
> Chiropractic may or may not be used ethically, just as any other
> profession. Given that, here are a few things to consider:
>
> The subject of whether or not chiropractic is effective in treating
> uncomplicated back pain has long been settled... it is. However the
> practice itself was not developed and is not limited to simply treat
> back pain. Chiropractic adjustments improve the functioning of the
> nervous system regardless of the presence of pain or other symptoms.
> You can look at this type of treatment as preventative, or better yet
> "wellness care". The detection and removal of spinal subluxations will
> be a part of a lifestyle that is focused on achieving optimal health.
> Physical, Spiritual and Mental well-being are necessary for optimal
> health and can be pursued with exercise, good nutrition, adequate rest,
> and stress reduction (either reducing stress-causing conditions or
> developing practices that reduce the effects of stress). The important
> thing to note in this model (which is certainly not unique to
> chiropractic, but is in harmony with its central philosophy) is that the
> focus is on increasing health, not on reducing symptoms. In contrast to
> the medical model, a person with no symptoms is not necessarily as
> healthy as the next person (I'm not as healthy as Lance Armstrong,
> though we both may be symptom/disease free to an MD). Raising your
> level of health to its optimum requires action on your part that can be
> greatly facilitated by many holistic practitioners in many different
> disciplines.
>
> If your only concern is the current presence or absence of pain, then
> ongoing chiropractic evaluation is not for you. If you want to increase
> your health towards its potential, become involved with your
> chiropractor and find what is right for you. You may do just as well
> getting checked once a month as twice a month. You can develop a
> conscious relationship with the functioning of your body and mind and
> easily determine for yourself if you need a chiropractic adjustment.
> Yoga and meditation are particularly helpful in this pursuit. Some
> people don't want to go that far and find, after trial and error, that
> their life is better with regular chiropractic evaluations (they sleep
> better, digest better, have more energy, etc.). BTW, the best chiro
> evaluation is one in which you don't need an adjustment, just like a
> check-up at the dentist. Would you wait until you have an abscessed
> tooth to make your first visit to the dentist?
>
> People in this country spend a great deal of money on fitness clubs,
> organic food, bottled water, Yoga classes, therapy, mattresses,
> massages, etc. All in the pursuit of increasing their health and living
> better, longer lives. Chiropractic has a valid place in this scheme,
> that place is determined by you based on what you want out of life.
>
> A good chiropractor will encourage you to make positive changes in your
> life, perhaps refer you to other professionals in the community who can
> help with this, leading to such a dramatic increase in your wellness
> that you almost never "need" to see him at all. Not a very good scam.
>
>
> --
> Boom!

Can you provide any randomly-controlled double blind longitudinal studies
which demonstrate the long term neurological effectiveness of "maintenance"
joint popping?

Yet, I can show *you* a study actually published by the National
Chiropractic College in Chicago which shows the lifespan of the average
Chiropractor in the United States is a mean 3.2 years less than the average
MD.

Tell you something?