From: Elizabeth on
Hi again,

I have recently had a 24-hour urine hormone test. The results are extensive,
and I am still trying to decipher them. My doctor has said that the results
are consistent with someone who has PCOS, although I don't seem to have a
severe form of it. As often happens, I come up with most of my questions
after I leave the appointment. Among the results were really high cortisol,
DHEA, and testosterone levels, along with low estrogen. The doc said I need
to just focus on nutrition, supplements, exercise, cutting out sugar, eating
small, frequent meals, and most of all, de-stressing. But she said
correcting my thyroid will most likely help, so I should see improvement
over the long-term.

Has anyone else here had high DHEA and cortisol? And what happened?

Thanks,
Elizabeth



From: deT notsuH on
But cortisol should NOT be high in PCOS, it should be normal or even low
as the androgens suppress the ACTH from your pituitary. If cortisol is
high, then I would think the doctor would be thinking more along the lines
of Cushing's. With a high DHEA-S, then that would lean toward Cushing's
disease (that is, pituitary) rather than an adrenal source.

FWIW, high cortisol suppresses T4 to T3 conversion, and tends to suppress
TSH (or TRH stimulation of the pituitary, which is really the same effect).
A high testosterone level will decrease the amounts of binding proteins
(a high T3-uptake test), which correspondingly leads to a lower total-T4
test (free-T4 would appear normal).

Not that I have a clue, mind you....I am not a doctor. Besides, I'm sure
you have independent proof of PCOS like ultrasound images etc etc.

Elizabeth wrote:
> Hi again,
>
> I have recently had a 24-hour urine hormone test. The results are extensive,
> and I am still trying to decipher them. My doctor has said that the results
> are consistent with someone who has PCOS, although I don't seem to have a
> severe form of it. As often happens, I come up with most of my questions
> after I leave the appointment. Among the results were really high cortisol,
> DHEA, and testosterone levels, along with low estrogen. The doc said I need
> to just focus on nutrition, supplements, exercise, cutting out sugar, eating
> small, frequent meals, and most of all, de-stressing. But she said
> correcting my thyroid will most likely help, so I should see improvement
> over the long-term.
>
> Has anyone else here had high DHEA and cortisol? And what happened?
>
> Thanks,
> Elizabeth
--
deT notsuH bass-ackwards ude.hcimu(a)pcird
After all my hypo problems, I'm glad to know that I've still
got "it." Now, if I could just remember where I put it...
From: Elizabeth on
"deT notsuH" <pcird*BACKWARDS*@hcimu.ude> wrote in message
news:gibhnn$vg4$1(a)news.datemas.de...
> But cortisol should NOT be high in PCOS, it should be normal or even low
> as the androgens suppress the ACTH from your pituitary. If cortisol is
> high, then I would think the doctor would be thinking more along the lines
> of Cushing's. With a high DHEA-S, then that would lean toward Cushing's
> disease (that is, pituitary) rather than an adrenal source.
>
> FWIW, high cortisol suppresses T4 to T3 conversion, and tends to suppress
> TSH (or TRH stimulation of the pituitary, which is really the same
> effect).
> A high testosterone level will decrease the amounts of binding proteins
> (a high T3-uptake test), which correspondingly leads to a lower total-T4
> test (free-T4 would appear normal).
>
> Not that I have a clue, mind you....I am not a doctor. Besides, I'm sure
> you have independent proof of PCOS like ultrasound images etc etc.
>
> Elizabeth wrote:
>> Hi again,
>>
>> I have recently had a 24-hour urine hormone test. The results are
>> extensive, and I am still trying to decipher them. My doctor has said
>> that the results are consistent with someone who has PCOS, although I
>> don't seem to have a severe form of it. As often happens, I come up with
>> most of my questions after I leave the appointment. Among the results
>> were really high cortisol, DHEA, and testosterone levels, along with low
>> estrogen. The doc said I need to just focus on nutrition, supplements,
>> exercise, cutting out sugar, eating small, frequent meals, and most of
>> all, de-stressing. But she said correcting my thyroid will most likely
>> help, so I should see improvement over the long-term.
>>
>> Has anyone else here had high DHEA and cortisol? And what happened?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Elizabeth
> --
> deT notsuH bass-ackwards ude.hcimu(a)pcird
> After all my hypo problems, I'm glad to know that I've still
> got "it." Now, if I could just remember where I put it...

deT,

I don't have any proof of PCOS and I don't know if I really do have it. I
plan to follow up with more questions, but some of the other things you've
said about T3 conversion do seem to apply to me. Without replacement, I have
both low T4 and T3, so there are probably multiple hormonal things going on.
I will look up Cushing's and see what it says.

Thanks,
Elizabeth


From: Elizabeth on
"deT notsuH" <pcird*BACKWARDS*@hcimu.ude> wrote in message
news:gibhnn$vg4$1(a)news.datemas.de...
> But cortisol should NOT be high in PCOS, it should be normal or even low
> as the androgens suppress the ACTH from your pituitary. If cortisol is
> high, then I would think the doctor would be thinking more along the lines
> of Cushing's. With a high DHEA-S, then that would lean toward Cushing's
> disease (that is, pituitary) rather than an adrenal source.
>
> FWIW, high cortisol suppresses T4 to T3 conversion, and tends to suppress
> TSH (or TRH stimulation of the pituitary, which is really the same
> effect).
> A high testosterone level will decrease the amounts of binding proteins
> (a high T3-uptake test), which correspondingly leads to a lower total-T4
> test (free-T4 would appear normal).
>
> Not that I have a clue, mind you....I am not a doctor. Besides, I'm sure
> you have independent proof of PCOS like ultrasound images etc etc.
>
> Elizabeth wrote:
>> Hi again,
>>
>> I have recently had a 24-hour urine hormone test. The results are
>> extensive, and I am still trying to decipher them. My doctor has said
>> that the results are consistent with someone who has PCOS, although I
>> don't seem to have a severe form of it. As often happens, I come up with
>> most of my questions after I leave the appointment. Among the results
>> were really high cortisol, DHEA, and testosterone levels, along with low
>> estrogen. The doc said I need to just focus on nutrition, supplements,
>> exercise, cutting out sugar, eating small, frequent meals, and most of
>> all, de-stressing. But she said correcting my thyroid will most likely
>> help, so I should see improvement over the long-term.
>>
>> Has anyone else here had high DHEA and cortisol? And what happened?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Elizabeth
> --
> deT notsuH bass-ackwards ude.hcimu(a)pcird
> After all my hypo problems, I'm glad to know that I've still
> got "it." Now, if I could just remember where I put it...

deT,

I don't seem to match the Cushing's profile. Regarding PCOS, though, I have
had many ultrasounds in the past. In fact, my left ovary was removed last
year due to massive cystic buildup and the right one is cystic but has not
built up. I'm not ruling it out yet but your information was useful.

Thanks,
Elizabeth


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