From: Mike on
David Wright wrote:
> In article <DUPwh.78$yH3.42(a)trndny07>, Mike <mike(a)xyz.com> wrote:
>> David Wright wrote:
>>> Children are almost never given TT or Td. The amount of thimerosal in
>>> even the heaviest pediatric HepB dose is less than you'd get from a
>>> tuna sandwich.
>> It is not so innocuous when you take body weight into account. One tuna
>> sandwich for a 9 lb infant is like 20 sandwiches for a 180 lb adult.
>> Actually it is even worse than that because an infant body is much
>> weaker, especially for very young children who do not have blood brain
>> barrier yet.
>
> Except that the amount of mercury is even smaller than the doses you
> seem to be worried about.

Smaller than what? Pregnant women are advised to avoid tuna sandwiches
to protect their future children, why should the children be getting an
equivalent of 20 tuna sandwiches?

> In any event, even infants clear thimerosal
> from the body with great rapidity.

Any proof? A research on monkeys found that some mercury ends up in the
brain.

> Go find something more significant
> to worry about. There are lots of candidates.
>

You seem to be uncomfortable even discussing that.

> -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
> These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
> "If George Bush were my dad, I'd be drunk in public so often that
> James Baker would have me killed." -- Bill Maher on the Bush twins
From: 8'FED on
Peter Bowditch wrote:

> I like my anti-vaccination liars to be consistent, but it seems that
> whatever you say to them they have another lie to use as an answer.
>
> Back in April 2006 I identified 13 definite causes of autism:

<snip>

Speaking of autism, almost a year ago (March 2006) there was a thread
in which you said to Jan:

People with Aspberger's (sic) Syndrome have a type of autism, not
"autism-like symptoms". Anyone who would use the latter expression
is either ignorant of the facts or doesn't care.

The essence of your point was correct. The phrase "autism-like
symptoms" suggests that the likeness is incidental and exists only at
the symptomatic level, thereby distancing asperger's syndrome from
autism, whereas no professional would argue that the two are not at
least closely related. However, I remember thinking at the time that
you'd left yourself open in asserting that asperger's syndrome is a
type of autism.

The more pedantic terminology, of course (and that which is less
likely to offend people with asperger's syndrome, to whom being
described as "autistic" can come across as degrading), is that
asperger's syndrome is a type of _autism spectrum disorder_.

I think this is worth reviewing, if only because the topic of autism
is visited somewhat regularly in this NG.

The Autism Association of South Australia explains the use of the
terms on its website (although for some reason, they say "asperger
syndrome" instead of "asperger's syndrome", but I prefer the latter):

Recently, the term Autism Spectrum Disorder has been used to group
two of the Pervasive Developmental Disorders - autism and Asperger
syndrome. Autism Spectrum Disorder is not a specific diagnostic
category. It is a term used to refer collectively to autism and
Asperger syndrome.

http://www.autismsa.org.au/html/disorders/asd_intro.html

Some literature suggests that high functioning autism (autism
without an intellectual disability) and Asperger syndrome are the
same disorder; and fall into the category of Asperger syndrome.
Other professionals argue that Asperger syndrome is not a separate
diagnostic category at all, and that all people on the autistic
spectrum, regardless of language or cognitive ability, have
autism.
However, professional and practical experience suggest that
neither
of these arguments may be the case. The Autism Association of
South
Australia, in line with international diagnostic criteria,
recognises that high functioning autism and Asperger syndrome,
although both part of the autistic spectrum, present slightly
differently.

http://www.autismsa.org.au/html/disorders/difference.html

I have copies of two diagnostic assessments made in the late
eighties,
before the term "autism spectrum disorder" came into use. The first
assessment was made in 1988 by the organisation which became the
Autism Association of South Australia, which was then known as The
Autistic Children's Association of South Australia (and then
diagnosed
only autism, not asperger's syndrome). It reads:

The team also believes that further investigation of {name}'s
problems is warranted and are referring him to Dr. {name} with
particular reference to an investigation of Asperger's syndrome.
This syndrome is akin to the autistic syndrome and it is
considered
by some professionals to be a mild form of autism.

The second diagnostic statement was made in 1989 by the Child and
Adolescent Mental Health Service at Flinders Medical Centre. It says:

From the history and the assessment, {name} fulfills many of the
criteria of an autistic-like syndrome - Asperger's.

In conclusion, although asperger's would indeed not be described as a
syndrome with autism-like symptoms, there *are* firm precedents for
calling it an autism-like syndrome. The former phrase (for which you
criticised Jan last March) suggests that the similarity is purely at
the
symptomatic level, whereas the latter implies (more honestly) a
relationship at the causative level as well.

> 13. Dioxin. (It must be true because it's in the Bible and the Bible
> Code is never wrong.)
>
> http://www.ratbags.com/rsoles/history/2006/04april.htm#22autism
>
> At the time I said that my favourite was the pasteurised milk, but now
> I think it is the Bible Code.

I've got a copy of the Bible Code; it was given to me as a present
one
year. Reading the blurb left me expecting it to be a work of fiction,
but as I started to read the text inside I discovered that, although
technically I'd been exactly right, the author did not agree.

Speaking of books (and changing the topic even further) the thought
occured to me today that http://rackstrawpress.nfshost.com/ might lie
within your broad fields of interest. (I confess a personal
motivation
for bringing this to your attention: the person who wrote the web
page
is a friend of mine, and is keen for word to spread. I have not read
the book.)

Adrian.

From: Mark Probert on
Mike wrote:
> David Wright wrote:
>>
>> Children are almost never given TT or Td. The amount of thimerosal in
>> even the heaviest pediatric HepB dose is less than you'd get from a
>> tuna sandwich.
>
> It is not so innocuous when you take body weight into account. One tuna
> sandwich for a 9 lb infant is like 20 sandwiches for a 180 lb adult.
> Actually it is even worse than that because an infant body is much
> weaker, especially for very young children who do not have blood brain
> barrier yet.

But, of course, comparing Thimerosal to tuna is inherently absurd.
From: Jan on
On Feb 3, 2:41�pm, Mark Probert <markprob...(a)lumbercartel.com> wrote:
> Mike wrote:
> > David Wright wrote:
>
> >> Children are almost never given TT or Td.  The amount of thimerosal in
> >> even the heaviest pediatric HepB dose is less than you'd get from a
> >> tuna sandwich.
>
> > It is not so innocuous when you take body weight into account. One tuna
> > sandwich for a 9 lb infant is like 20 sandwiches for a 180 lb adult.
> > Actually it is even worse than that because an infant body is much
> > weaker, especially for very young children who do not have blood brain
> > barrier yet.
>
> But, of course, comparing Thimerosal to tuna is inherently absurd.

Correct. So why are you and the *gang* doing just?

No need to answer. It is well known why.

From: Mike on
Mark Probert wrote:
> Mike wrote:
>> David Wright wrote:
>>>
>>> Children are almost never given TT or Td. The amount of thimerosal in
>>> even the heaviest pediatric HepB dose is less than you'd get from a
>>> tuna sandwich.
>>
>> It is not so innocuous when you take body weight into account. One
>> tuna sandwich for a 9 lb infant is like 20 sandwiches for a 180 lb
>> adult. Actually it is even worse than that because an infant body is
>> much weaker, especially for very young children who do not have blood
>> brain barrier yet.
>
> But, of course, comparing Thimerosal to tuna is inherently absurd.

Absurd or not, I was not the one who did the comparison, it was the
previous poster.
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