From: Kofi on
In article
<9e21ff35-6208-450e-a7f9-e1bf33eda38b(a)k13g2000prh.googlegroups.com>,
flamesrock <flamesrock(a)gmail.com> wrote:

> Kofi, I thought ALCAR was supposed to improve hair growth. Could you
> clarify?
>
> -thanks in advance

As I've pointed out in old articles, long-term use of acetyl-l-carnitine
regenerates peripheral nerves by upregulating the p75 low-affinity nerve
growth factor receptor. p75 is involved in cross-talk between hair
follicles and mast cells during the process of catagen.
From: harpersnotes on

Magnesium blood tests are fairly unreliable since levels fluctuate a
lot.
(As I dimly recall from various readings. I may be mistaken on this
particular point.)

Magnesium is recycled by the kidneys.
Many common diuretics can result in magnesium deficiency. (e.g. HCT.)

Magnesium is important for the chlorophyll process.
Rich nutrient sources include green leafy vegetables, seeds, and
nuts.

Magnesium, it used to be written, should be around half as much in the
diet
as calcium. (So for example if you are getting 1000 milligrams daily
of calcium, by that
general rule you should be getting 500 milligrams of magnesium.) The
suggested ratio
varies from author to author and frankly I haven't seen anything
specific in the research
literature, though I haven't gone looking for it either. My suspicion
has been for a couple
of decades that taking large amounts of calcium supplements can
artificially induce a
magnesium deficiency. Does anyone know more on this? Preferably with
sources that
are peer-reviewed and can be cited?

FWIW, (pasted from a very quick google search)...
Mineral Ratios for Calcium, Magnesium & other ElementsMost standard
Calcium / Magnesium formulations are sold in a ratio of 2:1, .... a
patient's calcium / magnesium ratio. Other types of anxiety,
fatigue, ...
www.acu-cell.com/mr.html - Cached - Similar

Richard H.





On Aug 7, 4:57 pm, "Are you kidding" <no...(a)nowhere.com> wrote:
> Thank you for the information. Is a magnesium deficiency something they can
> test for?
>
> Thanks again
>
> "Kofi" <k...(a)anon.un> wrote in message
>
> news:kofi-9C0068.11064506082009(a)news.east.earthlink.net...
>
>
>
> >> I am just wondering if anyone has experienced muscle twitching when your
> >> Crohns is flaring?
>
> > I'll skip the footnotes.
>
> > Magnesium deficiency should be at the top of your suspect list.  I had
> > severe muscle twitching until I started taking magnesium.  If this is
> > the cause of your problem, it's probably a disturbance in your TRPM
> > transporters either in the gut or kidneys.  It's vital you take
> > magnesium with calcium and phosphorus for good absorption - but this
> > won't necessarily help you retain it if the transporters in your kidney
> > are boxed.
>
> > As far as the transporters go, you need adequate intakes or levels of
> > vitamin D3, omega 3 fish oils and inulin (which may ultimately indicate
> > butyrate) to make them work properly.
>
> > Cyclosporine A and other drugs that knock down c-Fos or EGF expression
> > in the gut (green tea and curcumin fall into this camp) tend to inhibit
> > magnesium absorption.  Interfering with aldosterone, ACE or angiotensin
> > II might also do that.
>
> > Estrogen deficiency can cause magnesium deficiency.  There's good
> > evidence DHEA deficiency might cause it too - pointing to a general need
> > for proper sympathoadrenal tone (i.e., good function in your adrenal
> > glands).  I'm working on a paper now about that.
>
> > Oddly, some food dyes can interfere with vitamin D3 in the gut.
> > Brilliant Blue G blocks the cathlicidin receptor P2X7 and that then
> > would block EGF which you need for magnesium absorption and gut barrier
> > function.
>
> > I think acetyl-l-carnitine is an excellent suggestion.  It can, however,
> > directly stoke your neurotrophins which then affects cancer risk
> > (raising it for some, lowering it for others) and, of course, it sends
> > hair follicles into premature catagen.  So high doses of ALCAR (~
> > 3g/daily) might cause hair loss and/or brain tumors.  Then again,
> > magnesium deficiency is no picnic either.  It raises substance P levels
> > which then exacerbates neuropathy and allergic inflammation (which
> > should also cause hair loss through excessive mast cell degranulation).
> > Other carnitines might accomplish the same goal without the same side
> > effects.
>
> > FYI, magnesium deficiency is a contributor to obesity, hypertension and
> > other metabolic diseases.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

From: Joesepi on
Trouble with all that ratio stuff is they are based on content of one part
of your body (bone structure) and not required intake ratios / absorption
rates.


"harpersnotes" <harpersnotes(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
news:526f4691-414a-4619-b474-635c5c66321a(a)x6g2000prc.googlegroups.com...

Magnesium blood tests are fairly unreliable since levels fluctuate a
lot.
(As I dimly recall from various readings. I may be mistaken on this
particular point.)

Magnesium is recycled by the kidneys.
Many common diuretics can result in magnesium deficiency. (e.g. HCT.)

Magnesium is important for the chlorophyll process.
Rich nutrient sources include green leafy vegetables, seeds, and
nuts.

Magnesium, it used to be written, should be around half as much in the
diet
as calcium. (So for example if you are getting 1000 milligrams daily
of calcium, by that
general rule you should be getting 500 milligrams of magnesium.) The
suggested ratio
varies from author to author and frankly I haven't seen anything
specific in the research
literature, though I haven't gone looking for it either. My suspicion
has been for a couple
of decades that taking large amounts of calcium supplements can
artificially induce a
magnesium deficiency. Does anyone know more on this? Preferably with
sources that
are peer-reviewed and can be cited?

FWIW, (pasted from a very quick google search)...
Mineral Ratios for Calcium, Magnesium & other ElementsMost standard
Calcium / Magnesium formulations are sold in a ratio of 2:1, .... a
patient's calcium / magnesium ratio. Other types of anxiety,
fatigue, ...
www.acu-cell.com/mr.html - Cached - Similar

Richard H.





On Aug 7, 4:57 pm, "Are you kidding" <no...(a)nowhere.com> wrote:
> Thank you for the information. Is a magnesium deficiency something they
> can
> test for?
>
> Thanks again
>
> "Kofi" <k...(a)anon.un> wrote in message
>
> news:kofi-9C0068.11064506082009(a)news.east.earthlink.net...
>
>
>
> >> I am just wondering if anyone has experienced muscle twitching when
> >> your
> >> Crohns is flaring?
>
> > I'll skip the footnotes.
>
> > Magnesium deficiency should be at the top of your suspect list. I had
> > severe muscle twitching until I started taking magnesium. If this is
> > the cause of your problem, it's probably a disturbance in your TRPM
> > transporters either in the gut or kidneys. It's vital you take
> > magnesium with calcium and phosphorus for good absorption - but this
> > won't necessarily help you retain it if the transporters in your kidney
> > are boxed.
>
> > As far as the transporters go, you need adequate intakes or levels of
> > vitamin D3, omega 3 fish oils and inulin (which may ultimately indicate
> > butyrate) to make them work properly.
>
> > Cyclosporine A and other drugs that knock down c-Fos or EGF expression
> > in the gut (green tea and curcumin fall into this camp) tend to inhibit
> > magnesium absorption. Interfering with aldosterone, ACE or angiotensin
> > II might also do that.
>
> > Estrogen deficiency can cause magnesium deficiency. There's good
> > evidence DHEA deficiency might cause it too - pointing to a general need
> > for proper sympathoadrenal tone (i.e., good function in your adrenal
> > glands). I'm working on a paper now about that.
>
> > Oddly, some food dyes can interfere with vitamin D3 in the gut.
> > Brilliant Blue G blocks the cathlicidin receptor P2X7 and that then
> > would block EGF which you need for magnesium absorption and gut barrier
> > function.
>
> > I think acetyl-l-carnitine is an excellent suggestion. It can, however,
> > directly stoke your neurotrophins which then affects cancer risk
> > (raising it for some, lowering it for others) and, of course, it sends
> > hair follicles into premature catagen. So high doses of ALCAR (~
> > 3g/daily) might cause hair loss and/or brain tumors. Then again,
> > magnesium deficiency is no picnic either. It raises substance P levels
> > which then exacerbates neuropathy and allergic inflammation (which
> > should also cause hair loss through excessive mast cell degranulation).
> > Other carnitines might accomplish the same goal without the same side
> > effects.
>
> > FYI, magnesium deficiency is a contributor to obesity, hypertension and
> > other metabolic diseases.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -



From: flamesrock on
On Aug 9, 8:14 pm, Kofi <k...(a)anon.un> wrote:
> In article
> <9e21ff35-6208-450e-a7f9-e1bf33eda...(a)k13g2000prh.googlegroups.com>,
>
> flamesrock<flamesr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> > Kofi, I thought ALCAR was supposed to improve hair growth. Could you
> > clarify?
>
> > -thanks in advance
>
> As I've pointed out in old articles, long-term use of acetyl-l-carnitine
> regenerates peripheral nerves by upregulating the p75 low-affinity nerve
> growth factor receptor.  p75 is involved in cross-talk between hair
> follicles and mast cells during the process of catagen.

Ah thankyou
From: flamesrock on
What are the negative long-term consequences of supplementing
magnesium without calcium?

On Aug 13, 9:56 am, "Joesepi" <JRM(a)invalid..com> wrote:
> Trouble with all that ratio stuff is they are based on content of one part
> of your body (bone structure)  and not required intake ratios / absorption
> rates.
>
> "harpersnotes" <harpersno...(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:526f4691-414a-4619-b474-635c5c66321a(a)x6g2000prc.googlegroups.com...
>
> Magnesium blood tests are fairly unreliable since levels fluctuate a
> lot.
> (As I dimly recall from various readings. I may be mistaken on this
> particular point.)
>
> Magnesium is recycled by the kidneys.
> Many common diuretics can result in magnesium deficiency. (e.g. HCT.)
>
> Magnesium is important for the chlorophyll process.
> Rich nutrient sources include green leafy vegetables, seeds, and
> nuts.
>
> Magnesium, it used to be written, should be around half as much in the
> diet
> as calcium. (So for example if you are getting 1000 milligrams daily
> of calcium, by that
> general rule you should be getting 500 milligrams of magnesium.) The
> suggested ratio
> varies from author to author and frankly I haven't seen anything
> specific in the research
> literature, though I haven't gone looking for it either. My suspicion
> has been for a couple
> of decades that taking large amounts of calcium supplements can
> artificially induce a
> magnesium deficiency. Does anyone know more on this? Preferably with
> sources that
> are peer-reviewed and can be cited?
>
> FWIW, (pasted from a very quick google search)...
> Mineral Ratios for Calcium, Magnesium & other ElementsMost standard
> Calcium / Magnesium formulations are sold in a ratio of 2:1, .... a
> patient's calcium / magnesium ratio. Other types of anxiety,
> fatigue, ...www.acu-cell.com/mr.html- Cached - Similar
>
> Richard H.
>
> On Aug 7, 4:57 pm, "Are you kidding" <no...(a)nowhere.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > Thank you for the information. Is a magnesium deficiency something they
> > can
> > test for?
>
> > Thanks again
>
> > "Kofi" <k...(a)anon.un> wrote in message
>
> >news:kofi-9C0068.11064506082009(a)news.east.earthlink.net...
>
> > >> I am just wondering if anyone has experienced muscle twitching when
> > >> your
> > >> Crohns is flaring?
>
> > > I'll skip the footnotes.
>
> > > Magnesium deficiency should be at the top of your suspect list. I had
> > > severe muscle twitching until I started taking magnesium. If this is
> > > the cause of your problem, it's probably a disturbance in your TRPM
> > > transporters either in the gut or kidneys. It's vital you take
> > > magnesium with calcium and phosphorus for good absorption - but this
> > > won't necessarily help you retain it if the transporters in your kidney
> > > are boxed.
>
> > > As far as the transporters go, you need adequate intakes or levels of
> > > vitamin D3, omega 3 fish oils and inulin (which may ultimately indicate
> > > butyrate) to make them work properly.
>
> > > Cyclosporine A and other drugs that knock down c-Fos or EGF expression
> > > in the gut (green tea and curcumin fall into this camp) tend to inhibit
> > > magnesium absorption. Interfering with aldosterone, ACE or angiotensin
> > > II might also do that.
>
> > > Estrogen deficiency can cause magnesium deficiency. There's good
> > > evidence DHEA deficiency might cause it too - pointing to a general need
> > > for proper sympathoadrenal tone (i.e., good function in your adrenal
> > > glands). I'm working on a paper now about that.
>
> > > Oddly, some food dyes can interfere with vitamin D3 in the gut.
> > > Brilliant Blue G blocks the cathlicidin receptor P2X7 and that then
> > > would block EGF which you need for magnesium absorption and gut barrier
> > > function.
>
> > > I think acetyl-l-carnitine is an excellent suggestion. It can, however,
> > > directly stoke your neurotrophins which then affects cancer risk
> > > (raising it for some, lowering it for others) and, of course, it sends
> > > hair follicles into premature catagen. So high doses of ALCAR (~
> > > 3g/daily) might cause hair loss and/or brain tumors. Then again,
> > > magnesium deficiency is no picnic either. It raises substance P levels
> > > which then exacerbates neuropathy and allergic inflammation (which
> > > should also cause hair loss through excessive mast cell degranulation).
> > > Other carnitines might accomplish the same goal without the same side
> > > effects.
>
> > > FYI, magnesium deficiency is a contributor to obesity, hypertension and
> > > other metabolic diseases.- Hide quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -