From: awthrawthr on
Once again scientists are stunned to see compounds "melt" into a larger
compound. Some day, they'll realize what is going on, but right now,
they just don't know what to make of this unexpected result.

http://www.world-science.net/othernews/061012_tiny-genome.htm

When they do figure it out, they'll get another Nobel Prize, just like
two scientists were awarded one this year for discovering that bacteria
have the ability to shut off genes.

The next Nobel can be added to the leukotriene discovery by Bengt
Samuelsen's 1982 Nobel...something Revici identified prior to 1950.

And let us not forget John Clement's discovery of a lipoprotein
"surfactant" that earned him the Lasker Award. It was the first
recognized application of surface tension in human biology. Revici had
used surface tension prior to 1938 in the diagnosis and treatment for a
variety of diseases, conducting more than 100,000 tests on human
subjects by 1961, and received a patent for his urotensiometer.

From: JohnDoe on
awthrawthr(a)yahoo.com wrote:

> Once again scientists are stunned to see compounds "melt" into a larger
> compound. Some day, they'll realize what is going on, but right now,
> they just don't know what to make of this unexpected result.
>
> http://www.world-science.net/othernews/061012_tiny-genome.htm

I've read it and 'they' certainly do know what to make of this. What
they make of it is what's happening there is exactly what has been
proposed as the origin or organelles, where DNA from the organelle has
migrated into the host's DNA. You (and of course Revici) lose again.
There is no sign of a virus turning into a bacteria there. None.

> When they do figure it out, they'll get another Nobel Prize, just like
> two scientists were awarded one this year for discovering that bacteria
> have the ability to shut off genes.

Uhm, that was definitely not what they got the Nobel Prize for. There
are programs for grownups where they can improve their reading ability.
I suggest you look into those.

> The next Nobel can be added to the leukotriene discovery by Bengt
> Samuelsen's 1982 Nobel...something Revici identified prior to 1950.

So tell us, why didn't Revici get the Nobel Prize?
BTW, when I was at James Randi's office, I found, in the library under
the heading 'cancer quackery', the official report on the Senate
Committee hearings regarding alternative medicine in cancer treatment.
Revici was mentioned in that report. I read it and it didn't look good.
How is it possible that Revici, who after all cured scores of cancer
patients with his good arm tied behind his back and his fingers up his
nose, wasn't recognized as the all time greatest hero and genius of
medicine by that Committee? Can you explain why not?

> And let us not forget John Clement's discovery of a lipoprotein
> "surfactant" that earned him the Lasker Award. It was the first
> recognized application of surface tension in human biology. Revici had
> used surface tension prior to 1938 in the diagnosis and treatment for a
> variety of diseases, conducting more than 100,000 tests on human
> subjects by 1961, and received a patent for his urotensiometer.

And now, for something completely different: I haven't seen that nice
gentleman from Grayfield microscopes back with the evidence he promised.
You do remember the microscope that 'confirmed' yet another one of
Revici's fantasies? Do you have any idea what happened there? You think
poor fellow still didn't get a correct testslide?
From: awthrawthr on

JohnDoe wrote:
> awthrawthr(a)yahoo.com wrote:
>
> > Once again scientists are stunned to see compounds "melt" into a larger
> > compound. Some day, they'll realize what is going on, but right now,
> > they just don't know what to make of this unexpected result.
> >
> > http://www.world-science.net/othernews/061012_tiny-genome.htm
>
> I've read it and 'they' certainly do know what to make of this. What
> they make of it is what's happening there is exactly what has been
> proposed as the origin or organelles, where DNA from the organelle has
> migrated into the host's DNA. You (and of course Revici) lose again.
> There is no sign of a virus turning into a bacteria there. None.

what the scientists found to be so stunning was how one level of
biological organization accomodated or "melted" itself into another
level. That is a demonstration of hierarchic organization, which does
not apply solely to viruses and bacteria, but to every single level,
including organelles.

>
> > When they do figure it out, they'll get another Nobel Prize, just like
> > two scientists were awarded one this year for discovering that bacteria
> > have the ability to shut off genes.
>
> Uhm, that was definitely not what they got the Nobel Prize for. There
> are programs for grownups where they can improve their reading ability.
> I suggest you look into those.

It doesn't matter what the prize was awarded for...what is important in
this case in terms of Revici's theory is that in order for the
scientists to get the genes of a virus to stop expressing, that had to
use a bacteria! That necessity is in support of the Revici theory.

>
> > The next Nobel can be added to the leukotriene discovery by Bengt
> > Samuelsen's 1982 Nobel...something Revici identified prior to 1950.
>
> So tell us, why didn't Revici get the Nobel Prize?

I answered this question before, and you ran and hid. Now you want to
waste everyone's time pretending that the question wasn't answered.

> BTW, when I was at James Randi's office, I found, in the library under
> the heading 'cancer quackery', the official report on the Senate
> Committee hearings regarding alternative medicine in cancer treatment.
> Revici was mentioned in that report. I read it and it didn't look good.
> How is it possible that Revici, who after all cured scores of cancer
> patients with his good arm tied behind his back and his fingers up his
> nose, wasn't recognized as the all time greatest hero and genius of
> medicine by that Committee? Can you explain why not?

You went to a trickster's office for an explanation of cancer
treatments?? My older brother is a professional magician (part time).
He's been doing magic for about 50 years. He can make coins come out of
your ears. Do you think that there is a mint in your head because a
trickster can do that??

> > And let us not forget John Clement's discovery of a lipoprotein
> > "surfactant" that earned him the Lasker Award. It was the first
> > recognized application of surface tension in human biology. Revici had
> > used surface tension prior to 1938 in the diagnosis and treatment for a
> > variety of diseases, conducting more than 100,000 tests on human
> > subjects by 1961, and received a patent for his urotensiometer.
>
> And now, for something completely different: I haven't seen that nice
> gentleman from Grayfield microscopes back with the evidence he promised.
> You do remember the microscope that 'confirmed' yet another one of
> Revici's fantasies? Do you have any idea what happened there? You think
> poor fellow still didn't get a correct testslide?

Once again, this question was answered, whereupon you ran and hid.

I was speaking about the discovery of John Clements...yet you bring up
a subject that has nothing to do with surfactants, lipoproteins etc.
Maybe you ought to go see if Randi really does have a rabbit in his hat.

From: Sdores on
You keep bring up Revici, do you get money from it or something? You have
said if I remember correctly that you have his stuff patented in your name.
I just think you have beaten this to death already. Just my opinion but the
archives will show you bring this up a lot. UM MOM Susan
<awthrawthr(a)yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1160743295.866023.177070(a)m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...
> Once again scientists are stunned to see compounds "melt" into a larger
> compound. Some day, they'll realize what is going on, but right now,
> they just don't know what to make of this unexpected result.
>
> http://www.world-science.net/othernews/061012_tiny-genome.htm
>
> When they do figure it out, they'll get another Nobel Prize, just like
> two scientists were awarded one this year for discovering that bacteria
> have the ability to shut off genes.
>
> The next Nobel can be added to the leukotriene discovery by Bengt
> Samuelsen's 1982 Nobel...something Revici identified prior to 1950.
>
> And let us not forget John Clement's discovery of a lipoprotein
> "surfactant" that earned him the Lasker Award. It was the first
> recognized application of surface tension in human biology. Revici had
> used surface tension prior to 1938 in the diagnosis and treatment for a
> variety of diseases, conducting more than 100,000 tests on human
> subjects by 1961, and received a patent for his urotensiometer.
>


From: betsyb on
Seems like awthrawthr(a)yahoo.com has no home life and needs feedback any way
they can get it.

--

BetsyB

"Sdores" <sdores(a)bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:MVTXg.27038$zF5.9881(a)bignews1.bellsouth.net...
> You keep bring up Revici, do you get money from it or something? You have
> said if I remember correctly that you have his stuff patented in your
> name. I just think you have beaten this to death already. Just my opinion
> but the archives will show you bring this up a lot. UM MOM Susan
> <awthrawthr(a)yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:1160743295.866023.177070(a)m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...
>> Once again scientists are stunned to see compounds "melt" into a larger
>> compound. Some day, they'll realize what is going on, but right now,
>> they just don't know what to make of this unexpected result.
>>
>> http://www.world-science.net/othernews/061012_tiny-genome.htm
>>
>> When they do figure it out, they'll get another Nobel Prize, just like
>> two scientists were awarded one this year for discovering that bacteria
>> have the ability to shut off genes.
>>
>> The next Nobel can be added to the leukotriene discovery by Bengt
>> Samuelsen's 1982 Nobel...something Revici identified prior to 1950.
>>
>> And let us not forget John Clement's discovery of a lipoprotein
>> "surfactant" that earned him the Lasker Award. It was the first
>> recognized application of surface tension in human biology. Revici had
>> used surface tension prior to 1938 in the diagnosis and treatment for a
>> variety of diseases, conducting more than 100,000 tests on human
>> subjects by 1961, and received a patent for his urotensiometer.
>>
>
>


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