From: awthrawthr on

Sdores wrote:
> You keep bring up Revici, do you get money from it or something? You have
> said if I remember correctly that you have his stuff patented in your name.
> I just think you have beaten this to death already. Just my opinion but the
> archives will show you bring this up a lot. UM MOM Susan

Umm, your memory needs a lot of help...a lot!! Not one of Revici's
medications is in my name. It's simply stunning how you came to that
false thinking.

Quite obviously, your thinking about what is too much, too little, or
just right is not worth considering...any more than I would consider
someone with an IQ of 65, because they and you aren't quite bringing a
lot to the table.

> <awthrawthr(a)yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:1160743295.866023.177070(a)m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...
> > Once again scientists are stunned to see compounds "melt" into a larger
> > compound. Some day, they'll realize what is going on, but right now,
> > they just don't know what to make of this unexpected result.
> >
> > http://www.world-science.net/othernews/061012_tiny-genome.htm
> >
> > When they do figure it out, they'll get another Nobel Prize, just like
> > two scientists were awarded one this year for discovering that bacteria
> > have the ability to shut off genes.
> >
> > The next Nobel can be added to the leukotriene discovery by Bengt
> > Samuelsen's 1982 Nobel...something Revici identified prior to 1950.
> >
> > And let us not forget John Clement's discovery of a lipoprotein
> > "surfactant" that earned him the Lasker Award. It was the first
> > recognized application of surface tension in human biology. Revici had
> > used surface tension prior to 1938 in the diagnosis and treatment for a
> > variety of diseases, conducting more than 100,000 tests on human
> > subjects by 1961, and received a patent for his urotensiometer.
> >

From: awthrawthr on

betsyb wrote:
> Seems like awthrawthr(a)yahoo.com has no home life and needs feedback any way
> they can get it.

You might have gotten somewhere with that type of approach in middle
school. Welcome to the world of adults. Try not to get hurt.

>
> --
>
> BetsyB
>
> "Sdores" <sdores(a)bellsouth.net> wrote in message
> news:MVTXg.27038$zF5.9881(a)bignews1.bellsouth.net...
> > You keep bring up Revici, do you get money from it or something? You have
> > said if I remember correctly that you have his stuff patented in your
> > name. I just think you have beaten this to death already. Just my opinion
> > but the archives will show you bring this up a lot. UM MOM Susan
> > <awthrawthr(a)yahoo.com> wrote in message
> > news:1160743295.866023.177070(a)m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...
> >> Once again scientists are stunned to see compounds "melt" into a larger
> >> compound. Some day, they'll realize what is going on, but right now,
> >> they just don't know what to make of this unexpected result.
> >>
> >> http://www.world-science.net/othernews/061012_tiny-genome.htm
> >>
> >> When they do figure it out, they'll get another Nobel Prize, just like
> >> two scientists were awarded one this year for discovering that bacteria
> >> have the ability to shut off genes.
> >>
> >> The next Nobel can be added to the leukotriene discovery by Bengt
> >> Samuelsen's 1982 Nobel...something Revici identified prior to 1950.
> >>
> >> And let us not forget John Clement's discovery of a lipoprotein
> >> "surfactant" that earned him the Lasker Award. It was the first
> >> recognized application of surface tension in human biology. Revici had
> >> used surface tension prior to 1938 in the diagnosis and treatment for a
> >> variety of diseases, conducting more than 100,000 tests on human
> >> subjects by 1961, and received a patent for his urotensiometer.
> >>
> >
> >

From: Peter Bowditch on

>Revici had
>> used surface tension prior to 1938 in the diagnosis and treatment for a
>> variety of diseases, conducting more than 100,000 tests on human
>> subjects by 1961, and received a patent for his urotensiometer.

There were 8400 days between 1/1/1938 and 31/12/1960 which were
available for "conducting more than 100,000 tests on human subjects".

That is a about 12 tests per day on average. If Revici took weekends
off, that means about 17 tests per day. I won't bother to do the
calculations for public and religious holidays, vacations and illness
over 22 years, days when not all the subjects could get to his office,
....

He was a very busy man. It's no wonder his urine was tense. When would
he have had time to go?
--
Peter Bowditch aa #2243
The Millenium Project http://www.ratbags.com/rsoles
Australian Council Against Health Fraud http://www.acahf.org.au
Australian Skeptics http://www.skeptics.com.au
To email me use my first name only at ratbags.com
From: awthrawthr on

Peter Bowditch wrote:
> >Revici had
> >> used surface tension prior to 1938 in the diagnosis and treatment for a
> >> variety of diseases, conducting more than 100,000 tests on human
> >> subjects by 1961, and received a patent for his urotensiometer.
>
> There were 8400 days between 1/1/1938 and 31/12/1960 which were
> available for "conducting more than 100,000 tests on human subjects".
>
> That is a about 12 tests per day on average. If Revici took weekends
> off, that means about 17 tests per day. I won't bother to do the
> calculations for public and religious holidays, vacations and illness
> over 22 years, days when not all the subjects could get to his office,

In that case, the number of tests far exceeds 100,000. It's a simple
test done in seconds with the Urotensiometer to measure the surface
tension of the urine. It is done 4 times a day with each patient whose
disease has reached the interstitial level. Revici had his own hospital
for most of those days in Mexico and then in NY, so his staff could
conduct the tests with ease. Prior to that his patients were
hospitalized at facilities connected to the Pasteur Institutes.

Revici did work 7 days a week, almost every week of his life, btw.

Of course, the biological and possible pathological significance of
surface tension in humans was unheard of and dismissed at that time.
But, Dr. John Clemens, capitalizing on the discussion with Dr. Freeman
about surface tension led to the first widely accepted application
decades later. Clemens was honored with the Lasker Award for his
'discovery.'

> He was a very busy man. It's no wonder his urine was tense. When would
> he have had time to go?

Once again, it is demonstrated that you're speaking from a level of not
knowing what you were talking about. I'm glad to be able to clear it up
for you.

From: Jan Drew on

"Sdores" <sdores(a)bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:MVTXg.27038$zF5.9881(a)bignews1.bellsouth.net...
> You keep bring up Revici, do you get money from it or something? You have
> said if I remember correctly that you have his stuff patented in your
> name. I just think you have beaten this to death already. Just my opinion
> but the archives will show you bring this up a lot. UM MOM Susan

The archives show YOU bring up *I am having another flare up* Email me.
OT. OT, OT. Mark Probert
was nice to me in email. Cathyb is not Rosalind. I email her and she said
so, blah, blah, blah.
This is NOT a support group.
> <awthrawthr(a)yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:1160743295.866023.177070(a)m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...
>> Once again scientists are stunned to see compounds "melt" into a larger
>> compound. Some day, they'll realize what is going on, but right now,
>> they just don't know what to make of this unexpected result.
>>
>> http://www.world-science.net/othernews/061012_tiny-genome.htm
>>
>> When they do figure it out, they'll get another Nobel Prize, just like
>> two scientists were awarded one this year for discovering that bacteria
>> have the ability to shut off genes.
>>
>> The next Nobel can be added to the leukotriene discovery by Bengt
>> Samuelsen's 1982 Nobel...something Revici identified prior to 1950.
>>
>> And let us not forget John Clement's discovery of a lipoprotein
>> "surfactant" that earned him the Lasker Award. It was the first
>> recognized application of surface tension in human biology. Revici had
>> used surface tension prior to 1938 in the diagnosis and treatment for a
>> variety of diseases, conducting more than 100,000 tests on human
>> subjects by 1961, and received a patent for his urotensiometer.
>>
>
>


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