From: catbrusher on
There's an article in the NY Times about new
developments in LED bulbs:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/17/technology/17bulb.html?ref=energy-environment

They claim that Phillips, Sylvania and GE will put some reliable,
60-watt equivalent LED bulbs on the market later this year;
as early as August. Prices will run about $(US)50 to $(US)60
initially. This is supposed to be in-the-store availability, as
opposed to the present state where you have to order it
over the internet and wait for delivery. Quality-control should
become consistent, too. Right now some companies have a
good product and some sell garbage.

For the bulbs that are currently available, you can find
a listing with reviews here:

http://www.greenoptions.com/products/category/led-lightbulbs

The brightest bulb, the 13W Electrolux, has a fan that makes
a humming noise. All LED bulbs have two major problems.
One is that you can't use them in enclosed fixtures; they'll
overheat and burn out very quickly. The second flaw is
that they don't provide the same wide illumination field as
regular bulbs; even the best LED bulb leaves a large shadowed
area under the bulb. This isn't a problem if you put them
in a swing-arm lamp or floodlamp socket. (Third problem;
don't get the old-fashioned kind that has many small LEDs
in it, unless you want a very dim light. The newer lamps
use a very small number of elements.)

--Bill Thompson
From: Andy on
In message
<f6738c4f-1bc9-4835-94a6-02173d8814de(a)s41g2000vba.googlegroups.com>,
"catbrusher(a)yahoo.com" <wrthomps06(a)gmail.com> wrote
>There's an article in the NY Times about new
>developments in LED bulbs:
>
[]

Interesting; I've forwarded it to a colleague who leads the Eclipse
group over here - http://eclipse.lupusuk.org.uk/ - aimed at people who
react the same way to UV as others do to peanuts.

He was beginning to grab the ear of the government, but at the recent
election they got flung out which won't help our case :(

For those comparing products, note that in Britain the mains is 230
volts and we have several standards for lightbulb connections - bayonet
and at least two sizes of screw.
--
Andy Taylor [Chair, N E Lupus Group].
<URL:http://www.northeastlupus.org.uk>
From: catbrusher on
Andy wrote:

> "catbrus...(a)yahoo.com" <wrthomp...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>> There's an article in the NY Times about new developments in LED bulbs:

>> []

> For those comparing products, note that in Britain the mains is 230
> volts and we have several standards for lightbulb connections - bayonet
> and at least two sizes of screw.

Good point; the USA has the same problem. Our
standard Edison-type light bulb uses an E27 socket,
so you have to look for that in the specs.

I don't know if UK stores sell LED bulbs, but you
can find some for sale on ebay.co.uk. I assume
they're all compatible with local power sources.

Two more notes when purchasing LEDs. After looking
at on-line comments, I've seen complaints about the
variable quality of LED bulbs made in China. Also,
some LED bulbs use direct current; these are meant
for use in solar and battery-powered systems, and
won't work in normal household systems (Learned
that one the hard way, when a seller shipped me
the 12 volt DC type. The boxes were unmarked and
the labelling on the bulbs themselves were obscure).

--Bill Thompson
From: Andy on
In message
<2dd1630a-27eb-487c-888a-407d68f8be79(a)k31g2000vbu.googlegroups.com>,
"catbrusher(a)yahoo.com" <wrthomps06(a)gmail.com> wrote
[]
>
>I don't know if UK stores sell LED bulbs,

Yes. For example

http://nextday.diy.com/app/jsp/product/productPage.jsp?productId=32998

Note the special fitting! These are typically used in kitchens and
bathrooms.

> but you
>can find some for sale on ebay.co.uk. I assume
>they're all compatible with local power sources.

I'd check, but then I'm like that :)

>
>Two more notes when purchasing LEDs. After looking
>at on-line comments, I've seen complaints about the
>variable quality of LED bulbs made in China.

This may be true; however an increasing amount of stuff is only made in
one or two countries. Apparently there's no longer a maker of
photovoltaic cells in Europe.

>Also,
>some LED bulbs use direct current; these are meant
>for use in solar and battery-powered systems, and
>won't work in normal household systems (Learned
>that one the hard way, when a seller shipped me
>the 12 volt DC type. The boxes were unmarked and
>the labelling on the bulbs themselves were obscure).
>
Ah, but you'd get a brilliant light, albeit not for long...

Some Q I bulbs sold here have the same trouble.
--
Andy Taylor [Chair, N E Lupus Group].
<URL:http://www.northeastlupus.org.uk>
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