From: Kofi on
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010 Mar;125(3):766-7. Epub 2010 Feb 11.

Trichuris suis might be effective in treating allergic rhinitis.
Summers RW, Elliott DE, Weinstock JV.

Publication Types:
* Comment
* Letter

PMID: 20153033
From: truehawk on
On Jun 22, 11:45 pm, Kofi <k...(a)anon.un> wrote:
> J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010 Mar;125(3):766-7. Epub 2010 Feb 11.  
>
> Trichuris suis might be effective in treating allergic rhinitis.
> Summers RW, Elliott DE, Weinstock JV.
>
> Publication Types:
> *  Comment
> *  Letter
>
> PMID: 20153033

Brain worms anyone?
Really Really bad bad bad idea.
From: Kofi on
In article
<9ece9486-7f26-4f00-8b06-1f6f2eb7f76a(a)e5g2000yqn.googlegroups.com>,
truehawk <truehawk2(a)yahoo.com> wrote:

> On Jun 22, 11:45�pm, Kofi <k...(a)anon.un> wrote:
> > J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010 Mar;125(3):766-7. Epub 2010 Feb 11. �
> >
> > Trichuris suis might be effective in treating allergic rhinitis.
> > Summers RW, Elliott DE, Weinstock JV.
> >
> > Publication Types:
> > * �Comment
> > * �Letter
> >
> > PMID: 20153033
>
> Brain worms anyone?
> Really Really bad bad bad idea

These are intestinal worms - and they are native to pigs so they only
live about two weeks in humans. The lack of helminth colonization is
strongly statistically related to the incidence of allergy and
autoimmune disease in western civilization. In that sense, these aren't
parasitic but rather symbiotic. You wouldn't beat up lactobacillus just
because it's a bug and bugs caused the bubonic plague, would you?
From: truehawk on
On Jun 23, 11:24 pm, Kofi <k...(a)anon.un> wrote:
> In article
> <9ece9486-7f26-4f00-8b06-1f6f2eb7f...(a)e5g2000yqn.googlegroups.com>,
>
> truehawk <trueha...(a)yahoo.com> wrote:
> > On Jun 22, 11:45 pm, Kofi <k...(a)anon.un> wrote:
> > > J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010 Mar;125(3):766-7. Epub 2010 Feb 11.  
>
> > > Trichuris suis might be effective in treating allergic rhinitis.
> > > Summers RW, Elliott DE, Weinstock JV.
>
> > > Publication Types:
> > > *  Comment
> > > *  Letter
>
> > > PMID: 20153033
>
> > Brain worms anyone?
> > Really Really bad bad bad idea
>
> These are intestinal worms - and they are native to pigs so they only
> live about two weeks in humans.  The lack of helminth colonization is
> strongly statistically related to the incidence of allergy and
> autoimmune disease in western civilization.  In that sense, these aren't
> parasitic but rather symbiotic.  You wouldn't beat up lactobacillus just
> because it's a bug and bugs caused the bubonic plague, would you?

When the enemy is invisible it is easy to think the visibly suffering
and fighting are attacking themselves. Remember that 99% of the
bacteria are hyland, (that is colorless, clear if you will), and can
not be cultured by themselves), and that doctors are not in the habit
of looking at a tissue sample with live-dead stain to see what in the
clear goo might be living. the rational has been that if antibotics
did not resolve the symptoms, that the problem was likely an allergy
or cancer. (parantheticly there is a huge overlap between effective
cancer drugs and those found effective for worms and fungi, which also
can not be cultured)
Until very recently. Allergic theory was formulated in the era of the
invisible enemy.

The theory I have seen put forth is that the immune system becomes
hyper reactive because of the lack of worms the traditional target of
the
neutrophil
As I understand it the whole body of evidence behind autoimmune
diseases rests upon watching immune cells apparently attack
fellow human cells.
However read one the research papers on the immune modulatory
shanagins of Haemophilus
influenzae and you will see that HI excites and commandeers the
neutrophils of the immune system to attack competing bacteria, no lack
of worms necessary, just exposure to the flu and a ubiquitous bacteria
will do it.

Back in the 79-80 time frame Couch found that either the flu was using
staph, or the staph was using the flu. The bug seemed to be able to
harbor the live virus in a vacuole without actually becoming a host.
I havn't read anything like that in the last 30 years, but I have seen
research reports in several different instances, particularly that of
scarlet fever and a type of leukemia were found by FISH probes to
have either bacteria residing inside the cells, or foreign DNA
plasmids within the human cell which was making it express antigens on
the cell surface. In other words, the human cells that were being
attacked by one or the other immune cell were found to be Trogen
horses.
Also some species of Staph and every other bacteria that it swaps
programing with are able to express a super antigen that causes an
itchy reaction identical to the reaction to poison oak. Evidently the
fluid that the body produces in response to this insult is rich in
sugars the bug likes.
I am allergic to tetnus vaccine. When I get a tetnus shot by accident
while being sewn up from another accident, which has happened, I don't
just swell up locally, the focus is the injection site the swelling
spreads as the vaccine spreads. From my experience allergic response
would not be localized to one sinus or one side, or one spot.

So when it comes to allergy, I believe that it is more likely that
something is eating you or has recruited your immune system in a fight
for living space, rather than that you body has suddenly gone haywire
in just one spot.