From: Kofi on
Any idea if there's a list of doctors (by region) who perform this
procedure?

If not, could someone make one?

In article
<44c036ec-da16-4711-a51d-c41997f3591e(a)k39g2000yqd.googlegroups.com>,
asfyso <asfyso(a)yahoo.fr> wrote:

> http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/13/science/13micro.html?scp=6&sq=July+12+20
> 10&st=nyt
>
> How Microbes Defend and Define Us
> By CARL ZIMMER
> Dr. Alexander Khoruts had run out of options.
>
> In 2008, Dr. Khoruts, a gastroenterologist at the University of
> Minnesota, took on a patient suffering from a vicious gut infection of
> Clostridium difficile. She was crippled by constant diarrhea, which
> had left her in a wheelchair wearing diapers. Dr. Khoruts treated her
> with an assortment of antibiotics, but nothing could stop the
> bacteria. His patient was wasting away, losing 60 pounds over the
> course of eight months. �She was just dwindling down the drain, and
> she probably would have died,� Dr. Khoruts said.
>
> Dr. Khoruts decided his patient needed a transplant. But he didn�t
> give her a piece of someone else�s intestines, or a stomach, or any
> other organ. Instead, he gave her some of her husband�s bacteria.
>
> Dr. Khoruts mixed a small sample of her husband�s stool with saline
> solution and delivered it into her colon. Writing in the Journal of
> Clinical Gastroenterology last month, Dr. Khoruts and his colleagues
> reported that her diarrhea vanished in a day. Her Clostridium
> difficile infection disappeared as well and has not returned since.
>
> The procedure � known as bacteriotherapy or fecal transplantation �
> had been carried out a few times over the past few decades. But Dr.
> Khoruts and his colleagues were able to do something previous doctors
> could not: they took a genetic survey of the bacteria in her
> intestines before and after the transplant.
>
> Before the transplant, they found, her gut flora was in a desperate
> state. �The normal bacteria just didn�t exist in her,� said Dr.
> Khoruts. �She was colonized by all sorts of misfits.�
>
> Two weeks after the transplant, the scientists analyzed the microbes
> again. Her husband�s microbes had taken over. �That community was able
> to function and cure her disease in a matter of days,� said Janet
> Jansson, a microbial ecologist at Lawrence Berkeley National
> Laboratory and a co-author of the paper. �I didn�t expect it to work.
> The project blew me away.�
>
> (...)