From: trigonometry1972 on
Here is my somewhat off the cuff midway view with supporting
information.
---------------------------------------

A person with an HIV infection is in a marginal situation at best.
Drugs can buy a person time as can nutrition. It is likely in
some people super mega nutrition can indeed extend life.
Plus people respond in a biological ways to HIV exposure
and infection as some are resistant to getting the infection,
some progress more slowly, some have additional infections
that likely speed the progress to AIDs
Indeed for good results with anti-HIV meds one needs good nutrition
especially protein nutrition. There is some evidence that supplemental
selenium slows the onset of AIDs in the HIV infected. It
would follow that nutrients could help the immune system
hold the virus off awhile longer. The evidence is that
during the phase in which the virus is "latent" is actually
a phase in which the virus attacks and immune system
responses until the latter to worn down and out.
Then there come the details as to which nutrient
or which drug does what and I haven't sorted out
what I see some evidence as being useful and what
Rath claims or claimed.

The problem here is the lack of research and this lack
goes back to the fatally flawed system by which it is
conducted. Research should not be in the hands of
drug companies, none of it. They should have only
to jobs making and distributing it. Even ongoing
after its on the market should be hands of others.
Indeed researchers and drug companies need a
Great China Wall between them. Moreover the USFDA
should not be funded by drug company fees. Profits
should be capped as in this model the companies
are taking few development chances.

Recall also the free anti HIV drugs in Africa
don't represent everything a rich
man or womne in a western nation can get to suppress his disease.
After a point the virus can break thru and without
other drugs one is back on the fast road to the grave.

Each party by its intervention has speeded some subset of the
population in to the grave and some subset have likely benefited
as well from the very same parties. Neither of these
parties seem to offer an integrated approach which is
disappointing.

Don't assume these comments represent unbribled support
for Rath or his opponents for that matter.

The following are some support information
that supplemental micronutrients and macro-
nutrients benefit HIV infected persons.



====================================================
Clin Infect Dis. 2009 May 15;48(10):1475-8.

Effect of selenium supplements on hemoglobin
concentration and morbidity among
HIV-1-infected Tanzanian women.

Kupka R, Mugusi F, Aboud S, Hertzmark E, Spiegelman D, Fawzi WW.

Department of Nutrition,
Harvard School of Public Health,
Boston, Massachusetts,
USA. rkupka(a)post.harvard.edu

Selenium deficiency may increase risks of anemia and morbidity
among people with human immunodeficiency virus infection.
We therefore investigated the effect of selenium supplements
(200 microg of selenomethionine) on these end points among
915 pregnant Tanzanian women. Hemoglobin concentration was
measured at baseline (at 12-27 weeks of gestation) and
at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum, and morbidity data
were collected during monthly visits to the clinic.
Selenium supplements had no effect on hemoglobin
concentrations during follow-up (mean difference, 0.05 g/dL;
95% confidence interval, -0.07 to 0.16 g/dL) but reduced
diarrheal morbidity risk by 40% (relative risk, 0.60;
95% confidence interval, 0.42-0.84). There was no effect
on the other morbidity end points.

PMCID: PMC2777617 [Available on 2010/5/15]
PMID: 19368503 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
-----------------------------

This also looks interesting PMID: 19169336
-----------------------------

1. J Infect Dis. 2008 Jun 1;197(11):1499-505.

A trial of the effect of micronutrient supplementation
on treatment outcome, T cell counts, morbidity, and
mortality in adults with pulmonary tuberculosis.

Villamor E, Mugusi F, Urassa W, Bosch RJ, Saathoff E,
Matsumoto K, Meydani SN, Fawzi WW.

Department of Nutrition,
Harvard School of Public Health,
Boston, MA 02115, USA.
evillamo(a)hsph.harvard.edu

Comment in:
J Infect Dis. 2008 Jun 1;197(11):1487-9.
J Infect Dis. 2009 Jan 15;199(2):287-8; author reply 288.

BACKGROUND:
Tuberculosis (TB) often coincides with nutritional deficiencies.
The effects of micronutrient supplementation on TB treatment
outcomes,
clinical complications, and mortality are uncertain.

METHODS:
We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial
of micronutrients (vitamins A, B complex, C, and E, as well as
selenium)
in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We enrolled 471 human immunodeficiency
virus
(HIV)-infected and 416 HIV-negative adults with pulmonary
TB at the time of initiating chemotherapy and monitored them
for a median of 43 months.

RESULTS:
Micronutrients decreased the risk of TB recurrence
by 45% overall (95% confidence interval [CI], 7% to 67%;
P = .02) and by 63% in HIV-infected patients (95% CI,
8% to 85%; P = .02). There were no significant effects on
mortality overall; however, we noted a marginally
significant 64% reduction of deaths in HIV-negative
subjects (95% CI, -14% to 88%; P = .08). Supplementation
increased CD3+ and CD4+ cell counts and decreased the
incidence of extrapulmonary TB and genital ulcers in
HIV-negative patients. Micronutrients reduced the
incidence of peripheral neuropathy by 57% (95% CI,
41% to 69%; P < .001), irrespective of HIV status.
There were no significant effects on weight gain,
body composition, anemia, or HIV load.

CONCLUSIONS:
Micronutrient supplementation could improve the outcome
in patients undergoing TB chemotherapy in Tanzania.

PMCID: PMC2564793
PMID: 18471061 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
---------------------------------

1. J Infect Dis. 2009 Oct 1;200(7):1022-30.

Perinatal outcomes, including mother-to-child transmission of HIV, and
child
mortality and their association with maternal vitamin D status in
Tanzania.

Mehta S, Hunter DJ, Mugusi FM, Spiegelman D, Manji KP, Giovannucci EL,
Hertzmark
E, Msamanga GI, Fawzi WW.

Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston,
Massachusetts 02115, USA. smehta(a)hsph.harvard.edu

Comment in:
J Infect Dis. 2009 Oct 1;200(7):1015-7.

BACKGROUND:
Vitamin D is a strong immunomodulator and may protect
against adverse pregnancy outcomes, mother-to-child
transmission (MTCT) of human immunodeficiency
virus (HIV), and child mortality.

METHODS:
A total of 884 HIV-infected pregnant women who were
participating in a vitamin supplementation trial in
Tanzania were monitored to assess pregnancy outcomes
and child mortality. The association of these outcomes
with maternal vitamin D status at enrollment was examined
in an observational analysis.

RESULTS: No association was observed between maternal
vitamin D status and adverse pregnancy outcomes,
including low birth weight and preterm birth.
In multivariate models, a low maternal vitamin D level
(<32 ng/mL) was associated with a 50% higher risk
(95% confidence interval [CI], 2%-120%) of MTCT of
HIV at 6 weeks, a 2-fold higher risk of MTCT of HIV
through breast-feeding among children who were HIV
uninfected at 6 weeks (95% CI, 1.08-3.82), and
a 46% higher overall risk of HIV infection (95% CI, 11%-91%).
Children born to women with a low vitamin D level
had a 61% higher risk of dying during follow-up
(95% CI, 25%-107%).

CONCLUSIONS:
If found to be efficacious in randomized trials,
vitamin D supplementation could prove to be an
inexpensive method of reducing the burden of HIV
infection and death among children,
particularly in resource-limited settings.

PMCID: PMC2758703 [Available on 2010/10/1]
PMID: 19673647 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1. Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Sep 1;49(5):787-98.

Macronutrient supplementation for malnourished
HIV-infected adults: a review of the evidence in
resource-adequate and resource-constrained settings.

Koethe JR, Chi BH, Megazzini KM, Heimburger DC, Stringer JS.

Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia,
Lusaka, Zambia.
john.r.koethe(a)vanderbilt.edu

Access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for human
immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has expanded
rapidly throughout sub-Saharan Africa, but malnutrition
and food insecurity have emerged as major barriers
to the success of ART programs. Protein-calorie
malnutrition (a common form of malnutrition in the
region) hastens HIV disease progression, and food
insecurity is a barrier to medication adherence.
Analyses of patient outcomes have identified a low body
mass index after the start of ART as an independent
predictor of early mortality, but the causes of a
low body mass index are multifactorial (eg, normal
anthropometric variation, chronic inadequate food
intake, and/or wasting associated with HIV infection
and other infectious diseases). Although there is
much information on population-level humanitarian
food assistance, few data exist to measure the
effectiveness of macronutrient supplementation
or to identify individuals most likely to benefit.
In this report, we review the current evidence
supporting macronutrient supplementation for
HIV-infected adults, we report on clinical trials
in resource-adequate and resource-constrained settings,
and we highlight priority areas for future research.

PMID: 19624276 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]




Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Mar;48(1):65-8.

Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids as
anti-HIV supplementation during
breastfeeding.

Hsu K.

Department of Medical Research,
Mackay Memorial Hospital, Tamsui, Taiwan.
khsu1(a)ms1.mmh.org.tw

OBJECTIVE:
Breastfeeding by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive
mothers is an unavoidable practice in some very poor countries.
It has been suggested that long-chain polyunsaturated
fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) in breast milk, such as
arachidonic acid, act as natural, protective ingredients
against HIV transmission. The objective of this study was
to identify the protective mechanism of LC-PUFAs in cells
susceptible to HIV infection (e.g. human CD4+ T
cells, HeLa cells). RESULTS: LC-PUFAs are bioactive
molecules capable of activating the cellular protective
machinery via modulation of endogenous background K+ or
KCNK channels. KCNK channel expression contributes significantly
to the stability of the cell membrane potential.
During HIV-1 infection, degradation of the KCNK channel
is accelerated, and the cell membrane potential
becomes pathologically depolarized. From studying
functionally distinct KCNK mutants, we found that
the degree of membrane potential depolarization was
directly proportional to the release efficiency of
HIV-1 virions. On the other hand, supplementation of
KCNK channel modulators such as arachidonic acid (AA)
and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) at micromolar doses could
restore hyperpolarization and stability of the cell
membrane potential when endogenous KCNK channels are
partially knocked down (mimicking the depolarized state of an
HIV-1-infected cell).

CONCLUSION:
The protective mechanism of LC-PUFAs against
HIV spread involves stimulation of the endogenous
KCNK channels. Our work suggests that supplementation
with AA and DHA may be beneficial in reducing the
risk of HIV-1 transmission, particularly during
the period of breastfeeding.

PMID: 19346195 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

1. AIDS Care. 2008 Mar;20(3):370-5.

Dietary adequacy in Asian Indians with HIV.

Wig N, Bhatt SP, Sakhuja A, Srivastava S, Agarwal S.

Department of Internal Medicine,
All India Institute of Medical Sciences,
New Delhi, India.
naveet_wig(a)yahoo.com

Malnutrition is endemic in developing countries, which also
bear the brunt of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
pandemic. HIV and its complications have a significant
impact on nutritional status. Malnutrition and HIV have
deleterious interactions. Dietary inadequacy is a major
cause of malnutrition and few studies have been done
to assess dietary adequacy in HIV-infected individuals
and the factors affecting intake. Dietary intake of
71 consecutive patients was determined using 24-hour
dietary recall, with the help of a questionnaire and a
structured interview, and then compared with the
recommended dietary allowances (RDA). The dietary intake
of energy, total fat, fibre, vitamin C and iron were
significantly less than the recommended RDA.
There was no difference in protein intake.
Only 5.7% of males and 16.7% of females reached
the recommended energy allowance. The recommended protein
allowance was reached by 43.4% males and 44.4%
females and 41.5% males and 38.9% females consumed
more than the upper limit of the recommended fat intake.
Intake of major nutrients was also significantly less
when compared to the national average intake.
On bivariate analysis, the factors affecting
these inadequacies were found to be annual
per-capita income, dependency on another for
livelihood, CD4 counts more than 200/cubic millimeter
and absence of antiretroviral therapy.
On multivariate analysis, only dependency
on another was found to significantly influence
energy intake. Dietary intake of many food
constituents is significantly less in HIV patients
than that recommended. Dietary counselling
and efforts to improve food security are
important in management of these patients.

PMID: 18351486 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
--------------------------------------

1. Indian J Pediatr. 2008 Apr;75(4):347-50. Epub 2008 May 18.

Antioxidants in HIV positive children.

Srinivas A, Dias BF.

Department of Biochemistry,
Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical,
College, Sion,
Mumbai, India.

OBJECTIVE:
To assess the antioxidant status in HIV positive children.

METHODS:
HIV positive children under the age group of 3-12 years
from lower socio-economic strata were chosen for the study

(Group 1). The values were compared with normal children
(Group 2) not suffering from any disease in the same age
group and similar socio-economic strata.
The antioxidants chosen for the present study were
vitamin A (Retinol), vitamin C (Ascorbic acid) and
vitamin E (alpha tocopherol).

RESULTS:
Results obtained were subjected to statistical
analysis using student 't' test (in the present
study 'z' test was applied). The antioxidants
vitamin A, C and E decreased in HIV positive
children as compared to controls. Vitamin A was
significant to the level of p< 0.01 and vitamin C and E
to the level of p< 0.001 and p< 0.02 respectively.

CONCLUSION:
The decrease in antioxidants A, C and E in HIV positive
children is due to increased utilization of antioxidant
micronutrients because of increased oxidative stress
caused due to free radicals.

PMID: 18536888 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

------------------------

Patient Prefer Adherence. 2009 Nov 3;3:67-75.

Acceptability and effectiveness of chickpea
sesame-based ready-to-use therapeutic
food in malnourished HIV-positive adults.

Bahwere P, Sadler K, Collins S.

Valid International, Oxford, United Kingdom.

OBJECTIVE:
A prospective descriptive study to assess acceptability
and effectiveness of a locally made ready-to-use
therapeutic food (RUTF) in HIV-infected chronically
sick adults (CSA) with mid-upper-arm circumference
(MUAC) <210 mm or pitting edema.

METHODS:
Sixty-three wasted AIDS adults were prescribed 500 g
representing ~2600 kcal/day of locally made RUTF for
three months and routine cotrimoxazole. Weight, height,
MUAC, Karnofsky score and morbidity were measured at
admission and at monthly intervals. The amount of RUTF
intake and acceptability were assessed monthly.

RESULTS:
Ninety-five percent (60/63) of the CSA that were
invited to join the study agreed to participate.
Mean daily intake in these 60 patients was
300 g/person/day (~1590 Kcal and 40 g of protein).
Overall, 73.3% (44/60) gained weight, BMI, and MUAC.
The median weight, MUAC and BMI gains after three
months were 3.0 kg, 25.4 mm, and 1.1 kg/m(2), respectively.
The intervention improved the physical activity
performance of participants and 78.3% (47/60)
regained sufficient strength to walk to the nearest health facility.
Mortality at three months was 18.3% (11/60).

CONCLUSION:
Locally made RUTF was acceptable to patients and
was associated with a rapid weight gain and physical
activity performance. The intervention is likely
to be more cost effective than nutritional support
using usual food-aid commodities.

PMCID: PMC2778423
PMID: 19936147 [PubMed - in process]


Coyote dances while one is alive........................Trig





From: Mark Probert on
On Dec 12, 1:52 pm, PeterB - Original <p...(a)mytrashmail.com> wrote:
> On Dec 12, 6:45 am, Mark Probert <mark.prob...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Dec 11, 11:15 pm, PeterB - Original <p...(a)mytrashmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > > > Disease is Not the Mystery the Drug Makers Would Have You Believe
>
> > > > > It is well known that many diseases are caused by nutritional
> > > > > deficiencies, however the incidence of human illness triggered by
> > > > > vitamin insufficiency (less than optimal intake) is also well
> > > > > documented. Most are familiar with the more obvious examples, such as
> > > > > scurvy, pellagra, rickets, Beri Beri, and pernicious anemia.  But
> > > > > other conditions and symptoms are also medically linked to a shortfall
> > > > > in key nutritional food factors, including chronic fatigue, cold
> > > > > intolerance, low IQ, tingling sensations, irritability, gingivitis,
> > > > > easy bruising, nosebleeds, even leg cramps and chronic low back pain.
> > > > > Less commonly known nutrient-deficient diseases are  osteomalacia,
> > > > > koilonychia, hypocalcemia, cheilosis, protein energy malnutrition,
> > > > > electrolyte imbalance, copper-deficient anemia, Menkes Disease, and
> > > > > Xerophthalmia.   It is wholly consistent with biological science that
> > > > > hundreds of clinical pathologies are, in fact, the effects of chronic
> > > > > and overlapping vitamin and mineral deficiencies not readily
> > > > > diagnosed, in part because conventional diagnostics are focused on
> > > > > disease management rather than cure.  For example, it is well known
> > > > > that acute scurvy is fatal within months, yet the chronic effects of
> > > > > insufficient vitamin C intake over many years, which includes damage
> > > > > to arterial walls that leads to heart disease(1-5), are rarely
> > > > > considered.  What do pre-clinical scurvy, pellagra, anemia, or other
> > > > > nutrient-deficient diseases look like in their earlier stages?  These
> > > > > questions have indeed been scientifically studied and their results
> > > > > published in scientific journals, however the focus of the patent
> > > > > based model of medicine is drug development as opposed to nutrient-
> > > > > based therapies.  Is it any surprise that so many "vitamin" studies
> > > > > have relied on various synthetic forms manufactured by the drug
> > > > > makers, rather than their naturally-occurring plant forms?  This
> > > > > despite the fact that various synthetic vitamins are known to have
> > > > > more immediate toxic effects in human health at levels supposed to be
> > > > > therapeutic.  Furthermore, even when various illnesses are diagnosed
> > > > > as a result of nutritional deficiency, it remains largely unknown
> > > > > whether such conditions have resulted from dietary lapses or possibly
> > > > > the effects of prescribed medications known to interfere with nutrient
> > > > > uptake (8-9).  Linus Pauling, the nobel prize winner who championed
> > > > > supplemental vitamin C, said that many people with cardiovascular
> > > > > disease are actually suffering from "scurvy of the heart," or
> > > > > chronically low intake of vitamin C.  One naturopathic doctor with a
> > > > > well-known practice has also identified patients for a condition he
> > > > > refers to as  "beri beri" of the heart, resulting from chronically low
> > > > > intake of certain B vitamins.  The WHO has published its evaluation
> > > > > that some 3.5 billion or more human beings suffer the health effects
> > > > > of low-level iron intake even in industrialized nations and despite
> > > > > the absence of frank iron-deficient anemia (6-7).  Vitamin A
> > > > > deficiency is estimated to be prevalent in one half of the worlds
> > > > > nations (10).  The substantial research by Richard A. Passwater, Ph.D.
> > > > > provides overwhelming evidence over several decades of the
> > > > > relationship between nutrition and disease in sizable human
> > > > > populations (11).  Indeed, except for rare genetic disorders that
> > > > > affect only a very small percentage of people, the evidence is now
> > > > > clear that essential nutrients are of primary importance in both
> > > > > prevention and treatment of most human diseases.
>
> > > > > 1 Rath M, et al. Hypothesis: lipoprotein(a) is a surrogate for
> > > > > ascorbate. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1990 Aug;87(16):6204-7
> > > > > 2 Rath M, et al. Immunological evidence for the accumulation of
> > > > > lipoprotein(a) in the atherosclerotic lesion of the hypoascorbemic
> > > > > guinea pig. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1990 Dec;87(23):9388-90
> > > > > 3 Matthias Rath, et al. Unified Theory of Human Cardiovascular Disease
> > > > > Leading the Way to the Abolition of this Disease as a Cause for Human
> > > > > Mortality. Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine (1992; 7: 5-15)
> > > > > 4 Axel Niendorf, et al. Morphological detection and quantification of
> > > > > lipoprotein(a) deposition in atheromatous lesions of human aorta and
> > > > > coronary arteries. Virchows Archives of Pathological Anatomy, 1990,
> > > > > 417, Pgs 105-111
> > > > > 5 Matthias Rath, et al. Nutritional Supplement Program Halts
> > > > > Progression of Early Coronary Atherosclerosis Documented by Ultrafast
> > > > > Computed Tomography. Journal of Applied Nutrition (1996; 48: 68-78)
> > > > > 6http://www.wpro.who.int/health_topics/micronutrient_deficiencies/gene...
> > > > > 7http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/ida/en/index.html
> > > > > 8http://hubpages.com/hub/Drugs-can-Deplete-Your-Body-of-Nutrients
> > > > > 9http://www.ncpad.org/nutrition/fact_sheet.php?sheet=346
> > > > > 10http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/vad/en/index.html
> > > > > 11http://www.drpasswater.com/About.htm
> > > > > --- other supporting references ---http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/vitamin-c-000339.htmhttp://www.sci...
>
> > > > Matthias Rath is a murderer:
>
> > > And you're the Pope.
>
> > That would be a first. I am Jewish.
>
> > > > Matthias Rath, the vitamin campaigner accused of endangering thousands
> > > > of lives in South Africa by promoting his pills while denouncing
> > > > conventional medicines as toxic and dangerous, has dropped a year-long
> > > > libel action against the Guardian and been ordered to pay costs.
>
> > > That doesn't prove anything or change the results of studies published
> > > to his credit.
>
> > Sure it does, It demonstrates his faulty thinking, and the fact that
> > he would say anything to promote his ideas. Do not confuse his
> > "studies" with sales hype.
>
> Your bias in favor of unproven synthetic medicine makes your criticism
> of Rath and other pioneers in natural medicine meaningless.
>
> > > > Rath sued over three Guardian articles that condemned his promotional
> > > > activities among Aids sufferers in South African townships.
>
> > > Rath's dedication to service is not fairly described as "promotional
> > > activities."
>
> > So you say. However, the intelligent world says otherwise.
>
> You're wrong.  As usual.
>
> > > > A qualified doctor who is thought to have made millions selling
> > > > nutritional supplements around the globe through his website empire,
> > > > Rath claimed his pills could reverse the course of Aids and
> > > > distributed them free in South Africa, where campaigners, who have won
> > > > a hard-fought battle to persuade the government to roll out free Aids
> > > > drugs to keep millions alive, believe Rath's activities led to deaths.
>
> > > It's hardly surprising that drug maker profits, when threatened, find
> > > their way into the fray.
>
> > Free aids drugs do not equal profits.
>
> It's called promotion masquerading as good will.  Sad that.
>
> > >http://www4.dr-rath-foundation.org-
>
> > A sewer of bullshit.
>
> You and your sponsors are wrong about that.  Read about it in the
> "Warning" post, athttp://groups.google.com/group/sci.med/msg/f569f86c8ed22f4e-

Thanks for proving every point I ever made about you and why it is
pointless to try to discuss anything with you.

From: Mark Probert on
On Dec 12, 5:58 pm, "trigonometry1...(a)gmail.com |"
<trigonometry1...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> Here is my somewhat off the cuff midway view with supporting
> information.
> ---------------------------------------
>
> A person with an HIV infection is in a marginal situation at best.
> Drugs can buy a person time as can nutrition. It is likely in
> some people super mega nutrition can indeed extend life.
> Plus people respond in a biological ways to HIV exposure
> and infection as some are resistant to getting the infection,
> some progress more slowly, some have additional infections
> that likely speed the progress to AIDs
> Indeed for good results with anti-HIV meds one needs good nutrition
> especially protein nutrition. There is some evidence that supplemental
> selenium slows the onset of AIDs in the HIV infected. It
> would follow that nutrients could help the immune system
> hold the virus off awhile longer. The evidence is that
> during the phase in which the virus is "latent" is actually
> a phase in which the virus attacks and immune system
> responses until the latter to worn down and out.
> Then there come the details as to which nutrient
> or which drug does what and I haven't sorted out
> what I see some evidence as being useful and what
> Rath claims or claimed.
>
> The problem here is the lack of research and this lack
> goes back to the fatally flawed system by which it is
> conducted. Research should not be in the hands of
> drug companies, none of it. They should have only
> to jobs making and distributing it. Even ongoing
> after its on the market should be hands of others.
> Indeed researchers and drug companies need a
> Great China Wall between them. Moreover the USFDA
> should not be funded by drug company fees. Profits
> should be capped as in this model the companies
> are taking few development chances.
>
> Recall also the free anti HIV drugs in Africa
> don't represent everything a rich
> man or womne in a western nation can get to suppress his disease.
> After a point the virus can break thru and without
> other drugs one is back on the fast road to the grave.
>
> Each party by its intervention has speeded some subset of the
> population in to the grave and some subset have likely benefited
> as well from the very same parties. Neither of these
> parties seem to offer an integrated approach which is
> disappointing.
>
> Don't assume these comments represent unbribled support
> for Rath or his opponents for that matter.
>
> The following are some support information
> that supplemental micronutrients and macro-
> nutrients benefit HIV infected persons.
>
> ====================================================
> Clin Infect Dis. 2009 May 15;48(10):1475-8.
>
> Effect of selenium supplements on hemoglobin
> concentration and morbidity among
> HIV-1-infected Tanzanian women.
>
> Kupka R, Mugusi F, Aboud S, Hertzmark E, Spiegelman D, Fawzi WW.
>
> Department of Nutrition,
> Harvard School of Public Health,
> Boston, Massachusetts,
> USA. rku...(a)post.harvard.edu
>
> Selenium deficiency may increase risks of anemia and morbidity
> among people with  human immunodeficiency virus infection.
> We therefore investigated the effect of selenium supplements
> (200 microg of selenomethionine) on these end points among
> 915 pregnant Tanzanian women. Hemoglobin concentration was
> measured at baseline (at 12-27 weeks of gestation) and
> at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum, and morbidity data
> were collected during monthly visits to the clinic.
> Selenium supplements had no effect on hemoglobin
> concentrations during follow-up (mean difference, 0.05 g/dL;
> 95% confidence interval, -0.07 to 0.16 g/dL) but reduced
> diarrheal morbidity risk by 40% (relative risk, 0.60;
> 95% confidence interval, 0.42-0.84). There was no effect
> on the other morbidity end points.
>
> PMCID: PMC2777617 [Available on 2010/5/15]
> PMID: 19368503 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
> -----------------------------
>
> This also looks interesting PMID: 19169336
> -----------------------------
>
> 1. J Infect Dis. 2008 Jun 1;197(11):1499-505.
>
> A trial of the effect of micronutrient supplementation
> on treatment outcome, T cell counts, morbidity, and
> mortality in adults with pulmonary tuberculosis.
>
> Villamor E, Mugusi F, Urassa W, Bosch RJ, Saathoff E,
> Matsumoto K, Meydani SN, Fawzi WW.
>
> Department of Nutrition,
> Harvard School of Public Health,
> Boston, MA 02115, USA.
> evill...(a)hsph.harvard.edu
>
> Comment in:
>     J Infect Dis. 2008 Jun 1;197(11):1487-9.
> J Infect Dis. 2009 Jan 15;199(2):287-8; author reply 288.
>
> BACKGROUND:
> Tuberculosis (TB) often coincides with nutritional deficiencies.
> The effects of micronutrient supplementation on TB treatment
> outcomes,
> clinical complications, and mortality are uncertain.
>
> METHODS:
> We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial
> of micronutrients (vitamins A, B complex, C, and E, as well as
> selenium)
> in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We enrolled 471 human immunodeficiency
> virus
> (HIV)-infected and 416 HIV-negative adults with pulmonary
> TB at the time of initiating chemotherapy and monitored them
> for a median of 43 months.
>
> RESULTS:
> Micronutrients decreased the risk of TB recurrence
> by 45% overall (95% confidence interval [CI], 7% to 67%;
> P = .02) and by 63% in HIV-infected patients (95% CI,
> 8% to 85%; P = .02). There were no significant effects on
> mortality overall; however, we noted a marginally
> significant 64% reduction of deaths in HIV-negative
> subjects (95% CI, -14% to 88%; P = .08). Supplementation
> increased CD3+ and CD4+ cell counts and decreased the
> incidence of extrapulmonary TB and genital ulcers in
> HIV-negative patients. Micronutrients reduced the
> incidence of peripheral neuropathy by 57% (95% CI,
> 41% to 69%; P < .001), irrespective of HIV status.
> There were no significant effects on weight gain,
> body composition, anemia, or HIV load.
>
> CONCLUSIONS:
> Micronutrient supplementation could improve the outcome
> in patients undergoing TB chemotherapy in Tanzania.
>
> PMCID: PMC2564793
> PMID: 18471061 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
> ---------------------------------
>
> 1. J Infect Dis. 2009 Oct 1;200(7):1022-30.
>
> Perinatal outcomes, including mother-to-child transmission of HIV, and
> child
> mortality and their association with maternal vitamin D status in
> Tanzania.
>
> Mehta S, Hunter DJ, Mugusi FM, Spiegelman D, Manji KP, Giovannucci EL,
> Hertzmark
> E, Msamanga GI, Fawzi WW.
>
> Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston,
> Massachusetts 02115, USA. sme...(a)hsph.harvard.edu
>
> Comment in:
>     J Infect Dis. 2009 Oct 1;200(7):1015-7.
>
> BACKGROUND:
> Vitamin D is a strong immunomodulator and may protect
> against adverse pregnancy outcomes, mother-to-child
> transmission (MTCT) of human immunodeficiency
> virus (HIV), and child mortality.
>
> METHODS:
> A total of 884 HIV-infected pregnant women who were
> participating in a vitamin supplementation trial in
> Tanzania were  monitored to assess pregnancy outcomes
> and child mortality. The association of these outcomes
> with maternal vitamin D status at enrollment was examined
> in an observational analysis.
>
> RESULTS: No association was observed between maternal
> vitamin D status and adverse pregnancy outcomes,
> including low birth weight and preterm birth.
> In multivariate models, a low maternal vitamin D level
> (<32 ng/mL) was associated with a 50% higher risk
> (95% confidence interval [CI], 2%-120%) of MTCT of
> HIV at 6 weeks, a 2-fold higher risk of MTCT of HIV
> through breast-feeding among children who were HIV
> uninfected at 6 weeks (95% CI, 1.08-3.82), and
> a 46% higher overall risk of HIV infection (95% CI, 11%-91%).
> Children born to women with a low vitamin D level
> had a 61% higher risk of dying during follow-up
> (95% CI, 25%-107%).
>
> CONCLUSIONS:
> If found to be efficacious in randomized trials,
> vitamin D supplementation could prove to be an
> inexpensive method of reducing the burden of HIV
> infection and death among children,
> particularly in resource-limited settings.
>
> PMCID: PMC2758703 [Available on 2010/10/1]
> PMID: 19673647 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
>
> 1. Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Sep 1;49(5):787-98.
>
> Macronutrient supplementation for malnourished
> HIV-infected adults: a review of the evidence in
> resource-adequate and resource-constrained settings.
>
> Koethe JR, Chi BH, Megazzini KM, Heimburger DC, Stringer JS.
>
> Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia,
> Lusaka, Zambia.
> john.r.koe...(a)vanderbilt.edu
>
> Access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for human
> immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has expanded
> rapidly throughout sub-Saharan Africa, but malnutrition
> and food insecurity have emerged as major barriers
> to the success of ART programs. Protein-calorie
> malnutrition (a common form of malnutrition in the
> region) hastens HIV disease progression, and food
> insecurity is a barrier to medication adherence.
> Analyses of patient outcomes have identified a low body
> mass index after the start of ART as an independent
> predictor of early mortality, but the causes of a
> low body mass index are multifactorial (eg, normal
> anthropometric variation, chronic inadequate food
> intake, and/or wasting associated with HIV infection
> and other infectious diseases). Although there is
> much information on population-level humanitarian
> food assistance, few data exist to measure the
> effectiveness of macronutrient supplementation
> or to identify individuals most likely to benefit.
> In this report, we review the current evidence
> supporting macronutrient supplementation for
> HIV-infected adults, we report on clinical trials
> in resource-adequate and resource-constrained settings,
> and we highlight priority areas for future research.
>
> PMID: 19624276 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
>
> Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Mar;48(1):65-8.
>
> Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids as
> anti-HIV supplementation during
> breastfeeding.
>
> Hsu K.
>
> Department of Medical Research,
> Mackay Memorial Hospital, Tamsui, Taiwan.
> kh...(a)ms1.mmh.org.tw
>
> OBJECTIVE:
> Breastfeeding by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive
> mothers is an unavoidable practice in some very poor countries.
> It has been suggested that long-chain polyunsaturated
> fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) in breast milk, such as
> arachidonic acid, act as natural, protective ingredients
> against HIV transmission. The objective of this ...
>
> read more »

All well and good. Nutrition is important.

Rath wanted to substitute his magic potions for the anti-virals. That
is a recipe for death.
From: trigonometry1972 on
On Dec 12, 4:34 pm, Mark Probert <mark.prob...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> On Dec 12, 5:58 pm, "trigonometry1...(a)gmail.com |"
>
> <trigonometry1...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> > Here is my somewhat off the cuff midway view with supporting
> > information.
> > ---------------------------------------
>
> > A person with an HIV infection is in a marginal situation at best.
> > Drugs can buy a person time as can nutrition. It is likely in
> > some people super mega nutrition can indeed extend life.
> > Plus people respond in a biological ways to HIV exposure
> > and infection as some are resistant to getting the infection,
> > some progress more slowly, some have additional infections
> > that likely speed the progress to AIDs
> > Indeed for good results with anti-HIV meds one needs good nutrition
> > especially protein nutrition. There is some evidence that supplemental
> > selenium slows the onset of AIDs in the HIV infected. It
> > would follow that nutrients could help the immune system
> > hold the virus off awhile longer. The evidence is that
> > during the phase in which the virus is "latent" is actually
> > a phase in which the virus attacks and immune system
> > responses until the latter to worn down and out.
> > Then there come the details as to which nutrient
> > or which drug does what and I haven't sorted out
> > what I see some evidence as being useful and what
> > Rath claims or claimed.
>
> > The problem here is the lack of research and this lack
> > goes back to the fatally flawed system by which it is
> > conducted. Research should not be in the hands of
> > drug companies, none of it. They should have only
> > to jobs making and distributing it. Even ongoing
> > after its on the market should be hands of others.
> > Indeed researchers and drug companies need a
> > Great China Wall between them. Moreover the USFDA
> > should not be funded by drug company fees. Profits
> > should be capped as in this model the companies
> > are taking few development chances.
>
> > Recall also the free anti HIV drugs in Africa
> > don't represent everything a rich
> > man or womne in a western nation can get to suppress his disease.
> > After a point the virus can break thru and without
> > other drugs one is back on the fast road to the grave.
>
> > Each party by its intervention has speeded some subset of the
> > population in to the grave and some subset have likely benefited
> > as well from the very same parties. Neither of these
> > parties seem to offer an integrated approach which is
> > disappointing.
>
> > Don't assume these comments represent unbribled support
> > for Rath or his opponents for that matter.
>
> > The following are some support information
> > that supplemental micronutrients and macro-
> > nutrients benefit HIV infected persons.
>
> > ====================================================
> > Clin Infect Dis. 2009 May 15;48(10):1475-8.
>
> > Effect of selenium supplements on hemoglobin
> > concentration and morbidity among
> > HIV-1-infected Tanzanian women.
>
> > Kupka R, Mugusi F, Aboud S, Hertzmark E, Spiegelman D, Fawzi WW.
>
> > Department of Nutrition,
> > Harvard School of Public Health,
> > Boston, Massachusetts,
> > USA. rku...(a)post.harvard.edu
>
> > Selenium deficiency may increase risks of anemia and morbidity
> > among people with  human immunodeficiency virus infection.
> > We therefore investigated the effect of selenium supplements
> > (200 microg of selenomethionine) on these end points among
> > 915 pregnant Tanzanian women. Hemoglobin concentration was
> > measured at baseline (at 12-27 weeks of gestation) and
> > at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum, and morbidity data
> > were collected during monthly visits to the clinic.
> > Selenium supplements had no effect on hemoglobin
> > concentrations during follow-up (mean difference, 0.05 g/dL;
> > 95% confidence interval, -0.07 to 0.16 g/dL) but reduced
> > diarrheal morbidity risk by 40% (relative risk, 0.60;
> > 95% confidence interval, 0.42-0.84). There was no effect
> > on the other morbidity end points.
>
> > PMCID: PMC2777617 [Available on 2010/5/15]
> > PMID: 19368503 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
> > -----------------------------
>
> > This also looks interesting PMID: 19169336
> > -----------------------------
>
> > 1. J Infect Dis. 2008 Jun 1;197(11):1499-505.
>
> > A trial of the effect of micronutrient supplementation
> > on treatment outcome, T cell counts, morbidity, and
> > mortality in adults with pulmonary tuberculosis.
>
> > Villamor E, Mugusi F, Urassa W, Bosch RJ, Saathoff E,
> > Matsumoto K, Meydani SN, Fawzi WW.
>
> > Department of Nutrition,
> > Harvard School of Public Health,
> > Boston, MA 02115, USA.
> > evill...(a)hsph.harvard.edu
>
> > Comment in:
> >     J Infect Dis. 2008 Jun 1;197(11):1487-9.
> > J Infect Dis. 2009 Jan 15;199(2):287-8; author reply 288.
>
> > BACKGROUND:
> > Tuberculosis (TB) often coincides with nutritional deficiencies.
> > The effects of micronutrient supplementation on TB treatment
> > outcomes,
> > clinical complications, and mortality are uncertain.
>
> > METHODS:
> > We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial
> > of micronutrients (vitamins A, B complex, C, and E, as well as
> > selenium)
> > in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We enrolled 471 human immunodeficiency
> > virus
> > (HIV)-infected and 416 HIV-negative adults with pulmonary
> > TB at the time of initiating chemotherapy and monitored them
> > for a median of 43 months.
>
> > RESULTS:
> > Micronutrients decreased the risk of TB recurrence
> > by 45% overall (95% confidence interval [CI], 7% to 67%;
> > P = .02) and by 63% in HIV-infected patients (95% CI,
> > 8% to 85%; P = .02). There were no significant effects on
> > mortality overall; however, we noted a marginally
> > significant 64% reduction of deaths in HIV-negative
> > subjects (95% CI, -14% to 88%; P = .08). Supplementation
> > increased CD3+ and CD4+ cell counts and decreased the
> > incidence of extrapulmonary TB and genital ulcers in
> > HIV-negative patients. Micronutrients reduced the
> > incidence of peripheral neuropathy by 57% (95% CI,
> > 41% to 69%; P < .001), irrespective of HIV status.
> > There were no significant effects on weight gain,
> > body composition, anemia, or HIV load.
>
> > CONCLUSIONS:
> > Micronutrient supplementation could improve the outcome
> > in patients undergoing TB chemotherapy in Tanzania.
>
> > PMCID: PMC2564793
> > PMID: 18471061 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
> > ---------------------------------
>
> > 1. J Infect Dis. 2009 Oct 1;200(7):1022-30.
>
> > Perinatal outcomes, including mother-to-child transmission of HIV, and
> > child
> > mortality and their association with maternal vitamin D status in
> > Tanzania.
>
> > Mehta S, Hunter DJ, Mugusi FM, Spiegelman D, Manji KP, Giovannucci EL,
> > Hertzmark
> > E, Msamanga GI, Fawzi WW.
>
> > Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston,
> > Massachusetts 02115, USA. sme...(a)hsph.harvard.edu
>
> > Comment in:
> >     J Infect Dis. 2009 Oct 1;200(7):1015-7.
>
> > BACKGROUND:
> > Vitamin D is a strong immunomodulator and may protect
> > against adverse pregnancy outcomes, mother-to-child
> > transmission (MTCT) of human immunodeficiency
> > virus (HIV), and child mortality.
>
> > METHODS:
> > A total of 884 HIV-infected pregnant women who were
> > participating in a vitamin supplementation trial in
> > Tanzania were  monitored to assess pregnancy outcomes
> > and child mortality. The association of these outcomes
> > with maternal vitamin D status at enrollment was examined
> > in an observational analysis.
>
> > RESULTS: No association was observed between maternal
> > vitamin D status and adverse pregnancy outcomes,
> > including low birth weight and preterm birth.
> > In multivariate models, a low maternal vitamin D level
> > (<32 ng/mL) was associated with a 50% higher risk
> > (95% confidence interval [CI], 2%-120%) of MTCT of
> > HIV at 6 weeks, a 2-fold higher risk of MTCT of HIV
> > through breast-feeding among children who were HIV
> > uninfected at 6 weeks (95% CI, 1.08-3.82), and
> > a 46% higher overall risk of HIV infection (95% CI, 11%-91%).
> > Children born to women with a low vitamin D level
> > had a 61% higher risk of dying during follow-up
> > (95% CI, 25%-107%).
>
> > CONCLUSIONS:
> > If found to be efficacious in randomized trials,
> > vitamin D supplementation could prove to be an
> > inexpensive method of reducing the burden of HIV
> > infection and death among children,
> > particularly in resource-limited settings.
>
> > PMCID: PMC2758703 [Available on 2010/10/1]
> > PMID: 19673647 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
>
> > 1. Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Sep 1;49(5):787-98.
>
> > Macronutrient supplementation for malnourished
> > HIV-infected adults: a review of the evidence in
> > resource-adequate and resource-constrained settings.
>
> > Koethe JR, Chi BH, Megazzini KM, Heimburger DC, Stringer JS.
>
> > Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia,
> > Lusaka, Zambia.
> > john.r.koe...(a)vanderbilt.edu
>
> > Access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for human
> > immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has expanded
> > rapidly throughout sub-Saharan Africa, but malnutrition
> > and food insecurity have emerged as major barriers
> > to the success of ART programs. Protein-calorie
> > malnutrition (a common form of malnutrition in the
> > region) hastens HIV disease progression, and food
> > insecurity is a barrier to medication adherence.
> > Analyses of patient outcomes have identified a low body
> > mass index after the start of ART as an independent
> > predictor of early mortality, but the causes of a
> > low body mass index are multifactorial (eg, normal
> > anthropometric variation, chronic inadequate food
> > intake, and/or wasting associated with HIV infection
> > and other infectious diseases). Although there is
> > much information on population-level humanitarian
> > food assistance, few data exist to measure the
> > effectiveness of macronutrient supplementation
> > or to identify individuals most likely to benefit.
> > In this report, we review the current evidence
> > supporting macronutrient supplementation for
> > HIV-infected adults, we report on clinical trials
> > in resource-adequate and resource-constrained settings,
> > and we highlight priority areas for future research.
>
> > PMID: 19624276 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
>
> > Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Mar;48(1):65-8.
>
> > Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids as
> > anti-HIV supplementation during
> > breastfeeding.
>
> > Hsu K.
>
> > Department of Medical Research,
> > Mackay Memorial Hospital, Tamsui, Taiwan.
> > kh...(a)ms1.mmh.org.tw
>
> > OBJECTIVE:
> > Breastfeeding by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive
> > mothers is an unavoidable practice in some very poor countries.
> > It has been suggested that long-chain polyunsaturated
> > fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) in breast milk, such as
> > arachidonic acid, act as natural, protective ingredients
> > against HIV transmission. The objective of this ...
>
> > read more »
>
> All well and good. Nutrition is important.
>
> Rath wanted to substitute his magic potions for the anti-virals. That
> is a recipe for death.

Without decent nutrition, anti-retrovirals can be too toxic on
balance.
Nonetheless they can lengthen life for some with the right
circumstances
or can prevent the passage of the disease into the infant at birthing
thus
allowing a normal lifespan in later.

There are a variety personality types out in the world. And some
of them are listed under headings in the "DSM IV Handbook
of Differential Diagnosis." Use your discernment as to
application.

Light snow falling, 20 F at 5 PM...............................Trig
From: PeterB - Original on
On Dec 12, 7:21 pm, Mark Probert <mark.prob...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> On Dec 12, 1:52 pm, PeterB - Original <p...(a)mytrashmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Dec 12, 6:45 am, Mark Probert <mark.prob...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > On Dec 11, 11:15 pm, PeterB - Original <p...(a)mytrashmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > > > > Disease is Not the Mystery the Drug Makers Would Have You Believe
>
> > > > > > It is well known that many diseases are caused by nutritional
> > > > > > deficiencies, however the incidence of human illness triggered by
> > > > > > vitamin insufficiency (less than optimal intake) is also well
> > > > > > documented. Most are familiar with the more obvious examples, such as
> > > > > > scurvy, pellagra, rickets, Beri Beri, and pernicious anemia.  But
> > > > > > other conditions and symptoms are also medically linked to a shortfall
> > > > > > in key nutritional food factors, including chronic fatigue, cold
> > > > > > intolerance, low IQ, tingling sensations, irritability, gingivitis,
> > > > > > easy bruising, nosebleeds, even leg cramps and chronic low back pain.
> > > > > > Less commonly known nutrient-deficient diseases are  osteomalacia,
> > > > > > koilonychia, hypocalcemia, cheilosis, protein energy malnutrition,
> > > > > > electrolyte imbalance, copper-deficient anemia, Menkes Disease, and
> > > > > > Xerophthalmia.   It is wholly consistent with biological science that
> > > > > > hundreds of clinical pathologies are, in fact, the effects of chronic
> > > > > > and overlapping vitamin and mineral deficiencies not readily
> > > > > > diagnosed, in part because conventional diagnostics are focused on
> > > > > > disease management rather than cure.  For example, it is well known
> > > > > > that acute scurvy is fatal within months, yet the chronic effects of
> > > > > > insufficient vitamin C intake over many years, which includes damage
> > > > > > to arterial walls that leads to heart disease(1-5), are rarely
> > > > > > considered.  What do pre-clinical scurvy, pellagra, anemia, or other
> > > > > > nutrient-deficient diseases look like in their earlier stages?  These
> > > > > > questions have indeed been scientifically studied and their results
> > > > > > published in scientific journals, however the focus of the patent
> > > > > > based model of medicine is drug development as opposed to nutrient-
> > > > > > based therapies.  Is it any surprise that so many "vitamin" studies
> > > > > > have relied on various synthetic forms manufactured by the drug
> > > > > > makers, rather than their naturally-occurring plant forms?  This
> > > > > > despite the fact that various synthetic vitamins are known to have
> > > > > > more immediate toxic effects in human health at levels supposed to be
> > > > > > therapeutic.  Furthermore, even when various illnesses are diagnosed
> > > > > > as a result of nutritional deficiency, it remains largely unknown
> > > > > > whether such conditions have resulted from dietary lapses or possibly
> > > > > > the effects of prescribed medications known to interfere with nutrient
> > > > > > uptake (8-9).  Linus Pauling, the nobel prize winner who championed
> > > > > > supplemental vitamin C, said that many people with cardiovascular
> > > > > > disease are actually suffering from "scurvy of the heart," or
> > > > > > chronically low intake of vitamin C.  One naturopathic doctor with a
> > > > > > well-known practice has also identified patients for a condition he
> > > > > > refers to as  "beri beri" of the heart, resulting from chronically low
> > > > > > intake of certain B vitamins.  The WHO has published its evaluation
> > > > > > that some 3.5 billion or more human beings suffer the health effects
> > > > > > of low-level iron intake even in industrialized nations and despite
> > > > > > the absence of frank iron-deficient anemia (6-7).  Vitamin A
> > > > > > deficiency is estimated to be prevalent in one half of the worlds
> > > > > > nations (10).  The substantial research by Richard A. Passwater, Ph.D.
> > > > > > provides overwhelming evidence over several decades of the
> > > > > > relationship between nutrition and disease in sizable human
> > > > > > populations (11).  Indeed, except for rare genetic disorders that
> > > > > > affect only a very small percentage of people, the evidence is now
> > > > > > clear that essential nutrients are of primary importance in both
> > > > > > prevention and treatment of most human diseases.
>
> > > > > > 1 Rath M, et al. Hypothesis: lipoprotein(a) is a surrogate for
> > > > > > ascorbate. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1990 Aug;87(16):6204-7
> > > > > > 2 Rath M, et al. Immunological evidence for the accumulation of
> > > > > > lipoprotein(a) in the atherosclerotic lesion of the hypoascorbemic
> > > > > > guinea pig. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1990 Dec;87(23):9388-90
> > > > > > 3 Matthias Rath, et al. Unified Theory of Human Cardiovascular Disease
> > > > > > Leading the Way to the Abolition of this Disease as a Cause for Human
> > > > > > Mortality. Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine (1992; 7: 5-15)
> > > > > > 4 Axel Niendorf, et al. Morphological detection and quantification of
> > > > > > lipoprotein(a) deposition in atheromatous lesions of human aorta and
> > > > > > coronary arteries. Virchows Archives of Pathological Anatomy, 1990,
> > > > > > 417, Pgs 105-111
> > > > > > 5 Matthias Rath, et al. Nutritional Supplement Program Halts
> > > > > > Progression of Early Coronary Atherosclerosis Documented by Ultrafast
> > > > > > Computed Tomography. Journal of Applied Nutrition (1996; 48: 68-78)
> > > > > > 6http://www.wpro.who.int/health_topics/micronutrient_deficiencies/gene...
> > > > > > 7http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/ida/en/index.html
> > > > > > 8http://hubpages.com/hub/Drugs-can-Deplete-Your-Body-of-Nutrients
> > > > > > 9http://www.ncpad.org/nutrition/fact_sheet.php?sheet=346
> > > > > > 10http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/vad/en/index.html
> > > > > > 11http://www.drpasswater.com/About.htm
> > > > > > --- other supporting references ---http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/vitamin-c-000339.htmhttp://www.sci...
>
> > > > > Matthias Rath is a murderer:
>
> > > > And you're the Pope.
>
> > > That would be a first. I am Jewish.
>
> > > > > Matthias Rath, the vitamin campaigner accused of endangering thousands
> > > > > of lives in South Africa by promoting his pills while denouncing
> > > > > conventional medicines as toxic and dangerous, has dropped a year-long
> > > > > libel action against the Guardian and been ordered to pay costs.
>
> > > > That doesn't prove anything or change the results of studies published
> > > > to his credit.
>
> > > Sure it does, It demonstrates his faulty thinking, and the fact that
> > > he would say anything to promote his ideas. Do not confuse his
> > > "studies" with sales hype.
>
> > Your bias in favor of unproven synthetic medicine makes your criticism
> > of Rath and other pioneers in natural medicine meaningless.
>
> > > > > Rath sued over three Guardian articles that condemned his promotional
> > > > > activities among Aids sufferers in South African townships.
>
> > > > Rath's dedication to service is not fairly described as "promotional
> > > > activities."
>
> > > So you say. However, the intelligent world says otherwise.
>
> > You're wrong.  As usual.
>
> > > > > A qualified doctor who is thought to have made millions selling
> > > > > nutritional supplements around the globe through his website empire,
> > > > > Rath claimed his pills could reverse the course of Aids and
> > > > > distributed them free in South Africa, where campaigners, who have won
> > > > > a hard-fought battle to persuade the government to roll out free Aids
> > > > > drugs to keep millions alive, believe Rath's activities led to deaths.
>
> > > > It's hardly surprising that drug maker profits, when threatened, find
> > > > their way into the fray.
>
> > > Free aids drugs do not equal profits.
>
> > It's called promotion masquerading as good will.  Sad that.
>
> > > >http://www4.dr-rath-foundation.org-
>
> > > A sewer of bullshit.
>
> > You and your sponsors are wrong about that.  Read about it in the
> > "Warning" post, athttp://groups.google.com/group/sci.med/msg/f569f86c8ed22f4e-
>
> Thanks for proving every point I ever made about you and why it is
> pointless to try to discuss anything with you.

I'm surprised you can even spell the word "discussion."