From: Mark Thorson on
Excellent article in New England Journal of Medicine
about contamination in the severly underregulated
dietary supplements business. Many products contain
dangerous, unapproved drugs, and yet the public is
largely unaware how bad the situation is. A majority
of the public and even a third of medical students
wrongly believe that supplements have to be approved
by a government agency.

http://healthcarereform.nejm.org/?p=2017&query=home

The dietary supplement industry is a dirty business,
sorely in need of reform.
From: trigonometry1972 on
On Oct 9, 12:28 pm, Mark Thorson <nos...(a)sonic.net> wrote:
> Excellent article in New England Journal of Medicine
> about contamination in the severly underregulated
> dietary supplements business.  Many products contain
> dangerous, unapproved drugs, and yet the public is
> largely unaware how bad the situation is.  A majority
> of the public and even a third of medical students
> wrongly believe that supplements have to be approved
> by a government agency.
>
> http://healthcarereform.nejm.org/?p=2017&query=home
>
> The dietary supplement industry is a dirty business,
> sorely in need of reform.

Ha unapproved drugs they call them. I'll bet
they include alot of perfectly safe ingredients
in their list of "unapproved drugs,"
I wouldn't trust most proposed reforms other than
perhaps a bit more funding and monitoring to prevent
pharma drugs and toxics being slipped in by
crooks.

Big pharma is also a dirty business and
greedy business. For example they
use phthalates as time release agents.
Adverse effects are often underestimated
in my experience.

NEJM are the clowns that published a review
a few years ago that claimed 700 IU vitamin D was enough.
Going to the extent of misrepresenting
the views of the researchers.

roulette is safer than the full loaded gun
that Thorson would have people play with....................Trig
From: catherine hoffman on
On Oct 9, 12:28 pm, Mark Thorson <nos...(a)sonic.net> wrote:
> Excellent article in New England Journal of Medicine
> about contamination in the severly underregulated
> dietary supplements business.  Many products contain
> dangerous, unapproved drugs, and yet the public is
> largely unaware how bad the situation is.  A majority
> of the public and even a third of medical students
> wrongly believe that supplements have to be approved
> by a government agency.
>
> http://healthcarereform.nejm.org/?p=2017&query=home
>
> The dietary supplement industry is a dirty business,
> sorely in need of reform.

WoW!,
I know quite a bit about the FDA, but I didn't know that they did not
regulate the supplements. Is that also true for MLM companies?
From: trigonometry1972 on
On Oct 9, 1:01 pm, catherine hoffman <choffman0...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> On Oct 9, 12:28 pm, Mark Thorson <nos...(a)sonic.net> wrote:
>
> > Excellent article in New England Journal of Medicine
> > about contamination in the severly underregulated
> > dietary supplements business.  Many products contain
> > dangerous, unapproved drugs, and yet the public is
> > largely unaware how bad the situation is.  A majority
> > of the public and even a third of medical students
> > wrongly believe that supplements have to be approved
> > by a government agency.
>
> >http://healthcarereform.nejm.org/?p=2017&query=home
>
> > The dietary supplement industry is a dirty business,
> > sorely in need of reform.
>
> WoW!,
> I know quite a bit about the FDA, but I didn't know that they did not
> regulate the supplements. Is that also true for MLM companies?

Its not they don't have enough authority rather they choose
not to enforce it. The goal is to let the low lifes to
produce bad products and then use this as means
of suppressing supplements by way of draconian
regulations. Look at the EU were many supplement
are about to disappear due there oppressive
regulators. Don't take Thorson views at face
value. What he and his ilk want is the suppression
of supplements, IMO.
From: Mark Thorson on
catherine hoffman wrote:
>
> On Oct 9, 12:28 pm, Mark Thorson <nos...(a)sonic.net> wrote:
> > Excellent article in New England Journal of Medicine
> > about contamination in the severly underregulated
> > dietary supplements business. Many products contain
> > dangerous, unapproved drugs, and yet the public is
> > largely unaware how bad the situation is. A majority
> > of the public and even a third of medical students
> > wrongly believe that supplements have to be approved
> > by a government agency.
> >
> > http://healthcarereform.nejm.org/?p=2017&query=home
> >
> > The dietary supplement industry is a dirty business,
> > sorely in need of reform.
>
> WoW!,
> I know quite a bit about the FDA, but I didn't know that they did not
> regulate the supplements. Is that also true for MLM companies?

FDA doesn't approve supplements. FDA has some
limited regulatory powers, but not nearly enough
to ensure safety for consumers. The DSHEA of 1994
gutted FDA's enforcement powers, putting consumers
at great risk.

MLM is a business model, so it's pretty much
unrelated to supplement safety, except insofar
as MLM tends to attract the type of people who
would cut corners on safety.
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