From: Mark Probert on
On Oct 9, 4:55 pm, PeterB <p...(a)mytrashmail.com> wrote:
> On Oct 9, 4:29 pm, Mark Probert <mark.prob...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Oct 9, 3:48 pm, "trigonometry1...(a)gmail.com |"
>
> > <trigonometry1...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> > > On Oct 9, 12:28 pm, Mark Thorson <nos...(a)sonic.net> wrote:
>
> > > > Excellent article in New England Journal of Medicine
> > > > about contamination in the severly underregulated
> > > > dietary supplements business.  Many products contain
> > > > dangerous, unapproved drugs, and yet the public is
> > > > largely unaware how bad the situation is.  A majority
> > > > of the public and even a third of medical students
> > > > wrongly believe that supplements have to be approved
> > > > by a government agency.
>
> > > >http://healthcarereform.nejm.org/?p=2017&query=home
>
> > > > The dietary supplement industry is a dirty business,
> > > > sorely in need of reform.
>
> > > Ha unapproved drugs they call them. I'll bet
> > > they include alot of perfectly safe ingredients
> > > in their list of "unapproved drugs,"
> > > I wouldn't trust most proposed reforms other than
> > > perhaps a bit more funding and monitoring to prevent
> > > pharma drugs and toxics being slipped in by
> > > crooks.
>
> > I would like to see:
>
> > 1. Mandatory reporting of all adverse events, lawsuits, etc.
>
> > 2. Complete disclosure of all ingredients, and banning the term
> > "Proprietary bland" etc.
>
> > 3. Requirement that there be some standard of efficacy.
>
> > For starters.
>
> There is substantial "GMP" compliance by most of the reputable
> manufacturers, and many provide certified assays on request.  

Years ago, a doctor gave me a can of a supplement touted to treat
ADHD. It smelled pretty good, so we decided to try it on my son. The
problem was, it would not dissolve. It created a thick, gritty soupy
material that he would not touch, and, I found unpalatable.

I wrote to the manufacturer who refused to tell me the contents (that
is what a proprietary blend is).

Since we could not use it for the intended purpose, I used it in my
vegetable garden along with home made compost.

Best vegetables ever.

So, I wrote the manufacturer an endorsement of their product as a
fertilizer. I even sent them a zucchini, just so they could see how
good it was and posted it on their website.

They were not too happy.

Since a
> large percentage of these products are made using pharmaceutically-
> made materials,

That bears being proven by you.

> some of this problem rests with the drug makers.-

Nah. The problems rest with the whole idea of supplements. A balanced
diet does a fine job and no supplements are needed.

From: trigonometry1972 on
On Oct 9, 1:29 pm, Mark Probert <mark.prob...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> On Oct 9, 3:48 pm, "trigonometry1...(a)gmail.com |"
>
>
>
> <trigonometry1...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> > On Oct 9, 12:28 pm, Mark Thorson <nos...(a)sonic.net> wrote:
>
> > > Excellent article in New England Journal of Medicine
> > > about contamination in the severly underregulated
> > > dietary supplements business.  Many products contain
> > > dangerous, unapproved drugs, and yet the public is
> > > largely unaware how bad the situation is.  A majority
> > > of the public and even a third of medical students
> > > wrongly believe that supplements have to be approved
> > > by a government agency.
>
> > >http://healthcarereform.nejm.org/?p=2017&query=home
>
> > > The dietary supplement industry is a dirty business,
> > > sorely in need of reform.
>
> > Ha unapproved drugs they call them. I'll bet
> > they include alot of perfectly safe ingredients
> > in their list of "unapproved drugs,"
> > I wouldn't trust most proposed reforms other than
> > perhaps a bit more funding and monitoring to prevent
> > pharma drugs and toxics being slipped in by
> > crooks.
>
> I would like to see:
>
> 1. Mandatory reporting of all adverse events, lawsuits, etc.
>
> 2. Complete disclosure of all ingredients, and banning the term
> "Proprietary bland" etc.
>
> 3. Requirement that there be some standard of efficacy.
>
> For starters.

The last requirement is evil, wicked, and corrupt
when one looks how the EU is doing it regulation of
supplements. It is all to easy for government to
deny, drag their feet, and ignore the science and
then demand excessive levels of evidence and/or
wring their hands about safety to the point of
absolute stupidity. Vitamins and nutrients are not drugs.
Understand putting something on the market without
a clear claim should be an option as well.

I do agree their should be full content disclosure.
And I believe the US FDA already has the power on that
point if they chose to exercise it.

racking the wine.............Trig
From: trigonometry1972 on
On Oct 9, 1:30 pm, Mark Probert <mark.prob...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> On Oct 9, 4:11 pm, "trigonometry1...(a)gmail.com |"
>
>
>
> <trigonometry1...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> > On Oct 9, 1:01 pm, catherine hoffman <choffman0...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > On Oct 9, 12:28 pm, Mark Thorson <nos...(a)sonic.net> wrote:
>
> > > > Excellent article in New England Journal of Medicine
> > > > about contamination in the severly underregulated
> > > > dietary supplements business.  Many products contain
> > > > dangerous, unapproved drugs, and yet the public is
> > > > largely unaware how bad the situation is.  A majority
> > > > of the public and even a third of medical students
> > > > wrongly believe that supplements have to be approved
> > > > by a government agency.
>
> > > >http://healthcarereform.nejm.org/?p=2017&query=home
>
> > > > The dietary supplement industry is a dirty business,
> > > > sorely in need of reform.
>
> > > WoW!,
> > > I know quite a bit about the FDA, but I didn't know that they did not
> > > regulate the supplements. Is that also true for MLM companies?
>
> > Its not they don't have enough authority rather they choose
> > not to enforce it.
>
> Incorrect. They do not have enough authority. DSHEA.

Rubbish. The DSHEA is a great thing.
From: trigonometry1972 on
The maxim "the dose makes the poison" comes to mind.
You know I have contempt of homeopathy but I don't conflate
it with naturopathy or aggressive mega-nutrient use.

Trig
From: Happy Oyster on
On Fri, 9 Oct 2009 22:00:02 -0700 (PDT), "trigonometry1972(a)gmail.com |"
<trigonometry1972(a)gmail.com> wrote:


>> 3. Requirement that there be some standard of efficacy.
>>
>> For starters.
>
>The last requirement is evil, wicked, and corrupt
>when one looks how the EU is doing it regulation of
>supplements. It is all to easy for government to
>deny, drag their feet, and ignore the science and
>then demand excessive levels of evidence and/or

No.
--
Bettina Raddatz:
"Treu & Glauben, Hinter den Kulissen eines Wirtschaftsskandals"

http://www.ariplex.com/ama/ama_treu.htm
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